Breaking news and analysis on Hong Kong's economy and the companies that operate in the city, including macroeconomic indicators, the local government's finance and budget, retail sales, consumption,

employment and monetary policy.

Tokyo, Melbourne, Hong Kong: the world’s safest cities
Antte Alatalo had a surprise when he first walked around Seoul at night. There wasn’t anything to fear. The Finnish exchange student, 23, said the experience was in contrast to European cities, which were often unnerving after dark. “I have never felt isolated walking alone in Seoul as there are always other people strolling around in almost any part of the city, even late at night,” he said, adding “I have never seen a fight breaking out since I came here.” Among Alatalo and other international visitors, Seoul’s reputation as a safe city has been steadily gaining for years. The bi-yearly Safe Cities Index by The Economist Intelligence Unit ranked it the eighth safest city in the world in 2
Tokyo, Melbourne, Hong Kong: the world’s safest cities
Hit by unrest and recession, Hong Kong remains king of unaffordable housing
Hong Kong has been ranked yet again as the world’s least affordable housing market with social unrest failing to make any meaningful dent on home prices for most of 2019. It is the 10th straight year the city has held that dubious honor and is unlikely to be toppled in the near future. A family in the city would need to save up for 20.8 years to afford a home in the city, according to the annual Demographia International Housing Affordability Study, which ranks 92 major markets across the world based on median affordability scores. That has barely changed from 20.9 years in 2018. Vancouver came in a distant second at 11.9 while Sydney took third place at 11. Melbourne at 9.5 and Los Angeles
Hit by unrest and recession, Hong Kong remains king of unaffordable housing
This ex-bodyguard is making a killing thanks to Hong Kong unrest
Months of violent protests have landed a heavy blow to businesses in Hong Kong. But for Clement Lai, a former elite bodyguard, the unrest has been a boon. His private security firm has been in high demand as the anti-government demonstrations in Hong Kong have intensified, underscoring the increased volatility of the unrest and fears of violence in the Asian financial center. Formerly a close protection officer in the Hong Kong Police Force’s VIP protection unit, Lai was responsible for the personal safety of visiting Chinese leaders including President Jiang Zemin and then Vice-President Hu Jintao, as well as overseas dignitaries such as US President Bill Clinton. He set up Clement Shield i
This ex-bodyguard is making a killing thanks to Hong Kong unrest
Can Beijing’s golden child be more than the world’s casino capital?
Macau-born graphic designer Cheang Chi-wai remembers starting high school after the Portuguese colony was returned to China on December 20, 1999. The 31-year-old was taught the Chinese national anthem, attended regular flag-raising ceremonies, and was reminded constantly that he was Chinese and had to learn to love the motherland. “Before the handover, I had absolutely no sense of my identity,” Cheang said. The Portuguese were in control of Macau since 1557, but acted mainly as administrators in the decades before the city’s return to China.  Their colonial rule had been weakened significantly by a communist-fomented riot in December 1966, which left real political power largely in the hands
Can Beijing’s golden child be more than the world’s casino capital?
‘City of Darkness’: A tour of the world’s most famous walled neighborhood
“City of Darkness” is an exhibition exploring the long gone Walled City of Kowloon in Hong Kong as photographed by Greg Girard and Ian Lambot. Lambot and Girard set about photographing the Walled City shortly before its demolition in 1994 due to a deep fascination with the site. Nearly 30 years on from the Walled City’s demolition, this project offers a unique insight into the remarkable community, home to an estimated 50,000 people at its peak, and by far the most densely populated neighborhood the world had ever known.
‘City of Darkness’: A tour of the world’s most famous walled neighborhood
What to do with Hong Kong’s lost generation
A good friend was waiting at a bus stop in Wanchai, Hong Kong the other day while crowds of people milled past on their way to lunch. Listening to the chatter around him, he made an interesting observation. All the older people were talking about the crazy rioters and how they had wreaked terrible and unnecessary destruction on public property in Hong Kong. In the cold light of day, the senseless devastation is reminiscent of a war zone. The younger commuters were chatting about the many videoed instances of dazed demonstrators lying on the ground being kicked in the head by a reinforced police boot and the government’s lack of support for Hong Kong people. It has been a battle between a ra
What to do with Hong Kong’s lost generation
Why is the HK$ pegged to the US$?
The Hong Kong dollar has fallen to 7.85 per US dollar, its weakest level in 35 years. It touched the lower limit of the range of its peg to the US dollar. The Hong Kong dollar was pegged at 7.8 per US dollar since October 1983, and in 2005 a trading band of 7.75 to 7.85 was introduced. The city’s de facto central bank, the Hong Kong Monetary Authority, said that it will intervene to support the currency only if Hong Kong’s banks request it. But why is the HKD pegged to the USD? Watch our video to find out.
Why is the HK$ pegged to the US$?
Hong Kong hotels don’t want to share with Airbnb
Safe to say, hoteliers in Hong Kong aren’t fans of the sharing economy. A leading hotel business group in the city has hit back at Airbnb, calling for harsh punishments to be levied on home-sharing hosts. The Federation of Hong Kong Hotel Owners, which represents 90% of hotels in the city, has called on the government to come down harder on “illegal rentals” conducted through Airbnb. The group’s executive director Michael Li Hon-shing said that hoteliers had each invested tens of millions in their businesses, and it was unfair to have to compete with Airbnb hosts.   “How is it different from robbery?” Li said at a press conference on Tuesday. “You might as well go for communism.” Hong Kong
Hong Kong hotels don’t want to share with Airbnb
Richest man in Hong Kong retires
Hong Kong's richest man is finally retiring. Li Ka-shing, aged 89, announced today that he is ready to hang up his hat. With an estimated net worth of $35.3 billion, Li is the 23rd richest man in the world. Nicknamed “Superman” for his business acumen, Li announced on Friday that he would step down as chairman and executive director of CK Hutchison Holdings. He named his elder son Victor Li as his successor. But he's going to stay on in an advisory role.   ​ A son of a schoolteacher, Li is a self-made man. In 1940, Li and his family fled to Hong Kong from their hometown of Chaozhou, also known as Teochew, to escape the second Sino-Japanese war. He was 12. Soon after, his father passed away
Richest man in Hong Kong retires