Hong Kong protests

Hong Kong protests

The Hong Kong protests began in 2019 in opposition to a proposed extradition law that would have allowed the transfer of fugitives to mainland China, among other jurisdictions. The demonstrations esca

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The constitutional document that defines Hong Kong
Every Tuesday and Thursday, Inkstone Explains unravels the ideas and context behind the headlines to help you understand news about China. The Basic Law is Hong Kong’s equivalent of a constitution. It lays out how the city should be governed as a special administrative region of China. It went into effect on July 1, 1997, when the former British colony was handed over to Chinese rule. For over two decades, debate over the governance of Hong Kong has revolved around the Basic Law, with much of the focus on the rights and freedoms of the city’s 7.5 million residents, as well as Beijing’s role in its affairs.  What is ‘one country, two systems’? The Basic Law says that Hong Kong should be gover
Hongkongers look for a way out after Beijing announces security law
Hong Kong’s residents emigrated in large numbers before the former British colony’s return to Chinese sovereignty in 1997. They are hitting the inquiry lines again after the Chinese government announced plans for a national security law that some fear will be used to stifle dissent. Immigration consultants said they have fielded hundreds of new calls after details of the law, which will target a range of activities deemed to threaten national security, including subversion and secession, were first announced on May 21. “The day after that proposal, we received over a hundred calls,” said Andrew Lo, chief executive at Anlex, a Hong Kong-based immigration consultancy firm. “People are restles
Chinese students find their voices on US college campuses
Chinese students studying abroad have taken advantage of the freedoms they have outside China to voice their political views. In February, Hong Kong political activists Joshua Wong and Nathan Law were invited to speak at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. The event outraged some international students from mainland China. Inkstone joined them as they organized a protest on campus.
How Hong Kong became stuck between a rock and a hard place
The United States sent shock waves on Wednesday evening by certifying that Hong Kong was no longer highly autonomous from China. It’s a crucial move that could set the city on the path to losing preferential economic and trade treatment it enjoys from Washington. That assessment, announced by US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, was regarded as a retaliatory action against Beijing’s plan to enact a national security law for Hong Kong. While protesters in Hong Kong cheered the US announcement, hoping it will force Beijing to abandon its hardline approach to the city, the business community fears the impact on the city’s reputation as an international financial center.  This is what the American
Britain may give residency to Hongkongers over national security law
Britain has said it will offer greater citizenship rights to some Hongkongers if China proceeds with its plan to impose a national security law on the city, marking a dramatic shift to London’s long-held policy. The change concerns holders of British National (Overseas) passports, which were offered to Hongkongers born before the former British colony’s 1997 handover to China. Under current rules, the 300,000 people with those so-called BN(O) passport holders can visit the UK for up to six months but cannot work or apply for citizenship. British Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab said on Thursday that Britain was ready to change this rule, prompting China to accuse Britain of going back on a pro
US no longer deems Hong Kong autonomous. Here’s what to expect
US President Donald Trump has to decide what actions to take after the US state department told Congress on Wednesday that Hong Kong was no longer considered autonomous from China, an assessment that could threaten the city’s long-standing special trading status. “It’s a one-two action,” said David Stilwell, assistant secretary of the Bureau of East Asian and Pacific Affairs at the state department, on Wednesday evening. “One being the state department making the assessment that Hong Kong no longer enjoys autonomy,” he told reporters, referring to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo’s statement earlier in the day. “And then, [the second action will be] the determination by the White House as to h
Trump hints at action on China over Hong Kong security law
President Donald Trump said his administration would “do something” within days about the situation in Hong Kong after the Chinese government decided to impose controversial national security legislation on the city. Critics said the proposed law threatened the civil liberties in the former British colony, which returned to Chinese rule in 1997 as a highly autonomous special administrative region. On Wednesday, Hong Kong was embroiled in city-wide protests as the local legislature debated a bill that would criminalize booing the Chinese national anthem.  When asked if he was prepared to use sanctions against China over the national security legislation, Trump said: “We’re doing something now
‘Tear gas’ flavor for Hong Kong frozen treat
The owner of a gelato shop in Hong Kong is making a political statement by offering “tear gas” flavored gelato to his customers. The city's police force frequently used tear gas to disperse crowds during anti-government protests that broke out in 2019. The shop owner wants to use the unusual frozen treat to educate people about the pro-democracy movement.
China’s security law in Hong Kong: What you need to know
A controversial national security law concerning Hong Kong is expected to be on the agenda as China’s rubber-stamp legislative body, the National People’s Congress, began its most important annual meeting on Friday.  The law would ban all seditious activities aimed at toppling the central government and external interference in the city’s affairs, as well as target terrorist acts in Hong Kong. Beijing’s plan to make the law was announced less than a year after a proposal to allow extraditions from Hong Kong to mainland China sparked months of street unrest. Chinese officials have blamed foreign interference for fueling the protests. Critics of the expected legislation, including Hong Kong’s
Sparks could soon be flying between US and China over Hong Kong
Hong Kong will come under the spotlight at China’s biggest political event of the year following waves of protest last year. Sources told the South China Morning Post that Premier Li Keqiang was expected to take a tougher stance on Hong Kong when he delivers his work report to the National People’s Congress (NPC). The NPC, usually held in early March, was delayed until this month because of the pandemic. It is where Beijing announces its annual economic growth targets, sets budgets and lays out key development plans. Ordinarily, the premier's report contains a terse, one-paragraph mention of Hong Kong and Macau that reaffirms the “one country, two systems” principle that grants the former c