Hong Kong protests

Hong Kong protests

The Hong Kong protests began in 2019 in opposition to a proposed extradition law that would have allowed the transfer of fugitives to mainland China, among other jurisdictions. The demonstrations esca

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The primary election that resulted in Hong Kong’s national security mass arrests
The biggest mass arrests under the national security law in Hong Kong took place on Wednesday morning as 53 former opposition lawmakers and activists were rounded up for their roles in a primary election run-off last July. Inkstone looks at the controversial democratic primary and why it triggered Beijing’s ire. What was the opposition’s primary about? The 35-plus strategy was drafted by Benny Tai Yiu-ting in March last year. Tai was an organizer of the Occupy Central protests that ground the city to a halt for 79 days in 2014.  The primaries were organized to ensure those with the best chance could win votes and achieve a majority in the 70-seat legislature (or, 35-plus). This was to preve
BTS among other celebrities who dared to anger China
There has been mounting pressure on celebrities to avoid angering Beijing and Chinese netizens, and risk losing access to China’s lucrative market, with a growing number falling afoul of Chinese fans and regulators for remarks deemed politically incorrect in the past year. BTS K-pop sensation BTS was the latest to spark boycott calls in China, after the group’s leader Kim Nam-joon, known as RM, delivered a speech last month about remembering the “history of pain” and “sacrifices” by the US and South Korea during the Korean war. The comments drew backlash from Chinese netizens, who took to social media to complain that BTS had not acknowledged Chinese suffering during the war. The Korean war,
Rebel City: Hong Kong protest documentary lands on SCMP
The South China Morning Post, the parent company of Inkstone, is releasing a comprehensive new documentary about Hong Kong’s tumultuous anti-government protests of 2019, marking a year since a climactic showdown at a university campus. The hour-long production, titled China’s Rebel City, combines the access, expertise and on-the-ground reporting of award-winning Post journalists to deliver a no-holds-barred account of the events that pushed the city to the brink and reshaped its political landscape. The documentary, a companion piece to the book Rebel City: Hong Kong’s Year of Water and Fire, published in June, is being released in four parts. The first installment comes today on platform
4 Hong Kong activists tried to seek asylum in US consulate. They didn’t get it
Four Hong Kong activists entered the US consulate on Tuesday afternoon in a dramatic bid for asylum. The drama took place just hours after the city’s police national security unit arrested the former leader of a pro-independence group as he was planning a similar move at the diplomatic mission. A South China Morning Post reporter saw the four running toward the consulate and talking to security guards at the entrance before they were allowed into the compound. It is understood that they were later rejected, but there was no official confirmation. Sources said mainland Chinese officials in Hong Kong were aware of their attempt and closely monitoring what could have erupted into a major diplo
Welcoming message for Hong Kong refugees adds to China’s tensions with US, Canada
The potential acceptance of Hong Kong pro-democracy activists as political refugees led to a war of words between Beijing and governments in countries including the United States and Canada.  A number of developed countries have pledged to open their doors to Hongkongers, but the Chinese government has attacked them for what it describes as foreign interference in its domestic affairs.  Some of those who took part in the anti-government protests in Hong Kong have fled the city or are trying to leave over fears that they could face prosecution.  Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau last week responded to a veiled threat made by a Chinese diplomat after US National Security Advisor Robert O’
Greta Thunberg declares support for ‘Hong Kong 12’
Greta Thunberg, the high-profile global environmental activist, has waded into sensitive Chinese politics by demanding the release of 12 Hong Kong fugitives detained in mainland China after being arrested at sea while fleeing to Taiwan.  The Swedish environmentalist shared on Twitter a picture of her holding a whiteboard bearing the message “#SAVE12HKYOUTHS” in response to a direct appeal to back the cause from Joshua Wong Chi-fung, the poster boy of Hong Kong’s protest movement. She also wrote, “12 is more than just a number” and called on three other environmental activists to join her in the cause. The arrest of 12 Hong Kong activists in August has made international headlines and turned
Hong Kong security law: fleeing activists evoke sea escapes of the past
The recent capture at sea of 17 young Hong Kong activists as they attempted to escape to Taiwan was an all-too-familiar tale for older Hongkongers who risked life and limb in perilous journeys into or out of the city by water, but for three men, the story was deeply personal. Memories of their own brushes with danger came flooding back for Cai Chongguo, Lew Mon-hung and Tsang Kin-shing when news emerged on Wednesday that the mainland Chinese coastguard had arrested 12 local activists allegedly en route to Taiwan. Wednesday’s arrests came just days before Taiwanese media reported that five other Hong Kong activists had been intercepted by marine authorities from the self-ruled island late las
Rise of authoritarianism and what to do about it: a Q&A with Timothy Snyder
Do not obey in advance. Defend institutions. Believe in truth. These are some of the lessons that Yale University historian Timothy Snyder detailed in his book, “On Tyranny,” a guide to surviving America’s turn toward authoritarianism based on the events of 20th-century Europe. The lessons Snyder laid out in the 2017 book have found an eager audience also in Hong Kong and elsewhere. It became a best-seller during the protests that broke out in the city last summer, calling for greater autonomy from Beijing and freer elections. One of the most popular slogans centered its scrutiny on tyranny itself: “There are no rioters, only tyranny.” As Hong Kong’s freedoms face new threats from a sweeping
From Belarus to Thailand: Hong Kong’s protest playbook is spreading everywhere
Black-clad protesters with colorful umbrellas. Yellow helmets and plumes of tear gas. Leaderless crowds standing off against police. These protest scenes around the world – in places as different as Thailand, Belarus, Lebanon and the United States – have been striking in their likeness to the anti-government protests in Hong Kong last year. Social media has been central to helping protesters in Hong Kong draw global attention to their calls for freer elections and greater autonomy from Beijing. The loosely coordinated campaign in Hong Kong has also spread protest savvy, leading to a global wave of demonstrations more resistant to conventional law enforcement tactics and forming unlikely alli
This group may be the reason for recent Hong Kong national security law arrests
Hong Kong police arrested Apple Daily founder Jimmy Lai under the national security law as part of an investigation into an online group that canvassed foreign countries to sanction the city and received more than HK$1 million ($129,000) from overseas bank accounts, the South China Morning Post has learned. Former student activist Agnes Chow and two others arrested were also allegedly involved in the group. Sources said the group is called “I want laam caau,” a Cantonese expression meaning “embrace and fry.” It sums up the popular protest slogan, “If we burn, you burn with us,” used by participants in the anti-government unrest that roiled the former British colony last year. Officers from t