Hong Kong protests

Hong Kong protests

The Hong Kong protests began in 2019 in opposition to a proposed extradition law that would have allowed the transfer of fugitives to mainland China, among other jurisdictions. The demonstrations esca

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The #MilkTeaAlliance that connects Asian protesters
Every Tuesday and Thursday, Inkstone Explains unravels the ideas and context behind the headlines to help you understand news about China. An unusual alliance is forming between democracy advocates in Southeast Asia and East Asia.  On the 31st anniversary of the 1989 Tiananmen Square crackdown, some Thai students joined their Hong Kong counterparts in mourning demonstrators killed in central Beijing. Anti-government protesters in Hong Kong have backed Thai activists' call for democracy in the kingdom. And both were joined by Taiwanese critics of Beijing in lambasting its assertive moves against the self-ruled island. This union is called the Milk Tea Alliance, a nod to the ubiquitous drink i
Britain moves to halt extradition to Hong Kong over national security law
Britain was on Monday poised to announce plans to suspend or revoke its extradition treaty with Hong Kong in response to mainland China imposing a controversial national security law on the former British colony. The plans looked set to further sour Britain’s diplomatic relations with Beijing, as US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo began his London visit to hammer out a British-American strategy on China with Prime Minister Boris Johnson. British Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab was expected to make an announcement on the Hong Kong treaty when he addressed his country’s parliament on Monday. It followed weeks of lobbying from lawmakers to suspend a legal instrument they fear could be used by Hon
Front-line activists won big in Hong Kong polls. Beijing is not amused
Beijing could further crack down on Hong Kong’s political opposition ahead of key legislative elections in September, analysts say. Chinese officials have lashed out at organizers of an unofficial primary over the weekend after activists on the front lines of anti-government protests outperformed their rivals in the opposition bloc. Two central government offices overseeing Hong Kong affairs have accused the primary’s organizers of trying to subvert state power in breach of a new national security law. It may portend the mass disqualification of pro-democracy candidates that could lead to further unrest, observers said. “They might see the high turnout as a result of the mobilization of for
Hong Kong’s new security law puts social media giants in a tough spot
The Hong Kong authorities could block social media giants if they refused to hand over user data to the police under a new national security law, analysts said, describing a worst-case scenario that could drive global internet companies out of the Asian financial center. The world’s leading social media firms, including Google, Facebook (and its messaging app WhatsApp), Twitter, Telegram and LinkedIn, have so far presented a united front against such requests.  Their announcements to hit pause on processing requests by Hong Kong authorities for user data came a week after Beijing imposed the security law that critics feared could be used to crack down on dissent in the city. The former Briti
Global reach of Hong Kong security law ‘extraordinary and chilling’
The national security law that Beijing has imposed on Hong Kong has raised concerns among legal experts that it could apply everywhere. The controversial legislation came into force late on the night of June 30, after it was unanimously passed by Beijing’s top legislative body and signed into law by President Xi Jinping. The law prohibits secession, subversion, terrorism and collusion with a foreign country or external elements to endanger national security, with a maximum penalty of life in prison. Legal experts said Article 38 of the law, which covers even offenses by people outside the city who are not Hong Kong residents, creates a “chilling” overreach.  They said the coverage goes furth
Thousands protest China’s security law for Hong Kong
Thousands of people gathered in Hong Kong on Wednesday to protest a sweeping new security law that critics said could undermine the city’s political and legal autonomy.  Beijing imposed the law on Hong Kong on Tuesday night, which gives the Chinese authorities expansive powers to crack down on actions deemed as endangering national security.  Opposition politicians fear Beijing would use it as a tool to muzzle dissent in the former British colony, which returned to Chinese rule 23 years ago under a “one country, two systems” framework that gives it a wide range of civil liberties unavailable elsewhere in China. In the first test of the law, the Hong Kong police force said it arrested a man f
Washington’s mood darkens as China tightens its grip on Hong Kong
Washington expressed strong displeasure on Tuesday over the passage of the Hong Kong national security law as US lawmakers debated what leverage they have to effectively apply pressure on Beijing. “The United States will not stand idly by while China swallows Hong Kong into its authoritarian maw,” US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said in a statement. “The United States will continue to stand with the freedom-loving people of Hong Kong and respond to Beijing’s attacks on freedoms of speech, the press, and assembly, as well as the rule of law.” China’s top legislative body on Tuesday enacted the security law before its provisions had been seen by the Hong Kong government or the public. Crimi
Hongkongers convicted under new security law could be imprisoned for life
People convicted of crimes under a new national security law Beijing is imposing on Hong Kong could face life imprisonment, sources told the South China Morning Post. China’s top legislative body on Sunday kicked off a special three-day meeting fast-tracking the legislation, which is being tailor-made for the former British colony to prevent, stop and punish acts of secession, subversion, terrorism and collusion with foreign forces to endanger national security. Opposition politicians and critics said the bill could be used to suppress dissent and erode freedoms in the city, which is governed under a “one country, two systems” framework that gives Hong Kong considerable autonomy.  The legisl
‘I will never go back’: the Hong Kong protesters hiding in Taiwan
One of about 200 Hong Kong protesters believed to have left for Taiwan after social unrest erupted last year, Jack Chan (whose name has been changed at his request) has no idea what the future holds. Chan, in his 20s, headed to Taiwan after Hong Kong police started looking for him regarding his involvement in a serious offense during the city’s anti-government protests. Sitting in the Taipei flat he shares with seven other Hongkongers, all participants in the protests, he declined to say what he did, but admitted he supported violent means because peaceful protests had proven futile. “I want to tell my family that I am sorry for all the trouble I have brought them. They never scolded me, but
Hong Kong is getting a special police unit for its new national security law
Hong Kong police are setting up a dedicated unit to enforce the coming national security law, one that will be ready to function on the “very first day” the controversial legislation comes into effect, the city’s security minister told the South China Morning Post. John Lee, the minister, said the new unit, would be commanded by Hong Kong’s police commissioner Chris Tang. It would have intelligence-gathering, investigation and training capabilities, Lee said. But he declined to elaborate on how police would work with the new agency the mainland’s national security authorities are expected to set up in Hong Kong after the law is in place. The revelation came a week after the security minister