The Hong Kong protests in 2019 began in opposition to a proposed extradition law that would have allowed the transfer of fugitives to mainland China, among other jurisdictions. The demonstrations have

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Fashion brands no longer see Hong Kong as bridge to 1.4 billion consumers
Make it in Hong Kong and you might just break into China. This unofficial business plan has served international fashion brands well for the last decade. But in a shift that could prove seismic for the city’s fashion industry, brands with little to no presence in Greater China are increasingly bypassing Hong Kong and making Shanghai or Beijing their first port of call. As a city that European and American brands identify with in terms of culture, language and shopping habits, Hong Kong has long benefited from its reputation as a China-light launch pad. Lane Crawford, which is headquartered in Hong Kong, has long been the first stop for foreign designers hoping the crack the China code.  The
Fashion brands no longer see Hong Kong as bridge to 1.4 billion consumers
‘No Mandarin allowed’: dining in ‘Hongkongers-only’ restaurants
A restaurant in Hong Kong posted this on Facebook: “From now on, we will only serve Hongkongers. Only Cantonese and English are allowed when placing orders. We do not serve Mandarin speakers.” An edited version of the post later said, “Update: Taiwanese people are allowed.” When I was standing in front of the restaurant with my friend, both of us from mainland China, we were anxious and a bit embarrassed. “Let’s order in Cantonese, and then we can speak Mandarin with each other,” I said, in Cantonese. She agreed. The coronavirus outbreak, which started in mainland China and has spread to Hong Kong, has become the latest fuel in the anti-mainland sentiment in the former British colony. The g
‘No Mandarin allowed’: dining in ‘Hongkongers-only’ restaurants
Film festivals continue to tell the story of Hong Kong unrest
It is difficult for Hongkongers to find a nearby cinema to watch locally made films about the ongoing anti-government protests. But interest in the demonstrations has led foreign cinemas and film festivals to program documentaries and feature films relating to Hong Kong’s political movements. This month, the Netherlands’ International Film Festival Rotterdam, one of the world’s top-10 film festivals, is screening a film series called “Ordinary Heroes: Made in Hong Kong.” It comprises of more than 20 documentaries, features and short films that focus on the Umbrella Movement in 2014 and the current protests. The festival opens on January 22. In New York City, the popular Metrograph Cinema on
Film festivals continue to tell the story of Hong Kong unrest
Tokyo, Melbourne, Hong Kong: the world’s safest cities
Antte Alatalo had a surprise when he first walked around Seoul at night. There wasn’t anything to fear. The Finnish exchange student, 23, said the experience was in contrast to European cities, which were often unnerving after dark. “I have never felt isolated walking alone in Seoul as there are always other people strolling around in almost any part of the city, even late at night,” he said, adding “I have never seen a fight breaking out since I came here.” Among Alatalo and other international visitors, Seoul’s reputation as a safe city has been steadily gaining for years. The bi-yearly Safe Cities Index by The Economist Intelligence Unit ranked it the eighth safest city in the world in 2
Tokyo, Melbourne, Hong Kong: the world’s safest cities
Hit by unrest and recession, Hong Kong remains king of unaffordable housing
Hong Kong has been ranked yet again as the world’s least affordable housing market with social unrest failing to make any meaningful dent on home prices for most of 2019. It is the 10th straight year the city has held that dubious honor and is unlikely to be toppled in the near future. A family in the city would need to save up for 20.8 years to afford a home in the city, according to the annual Demographia International Housing Affordability Study, which ranks 92 major markets across the world based on median affordability scores. That has barely changed from 20.9 years in 2018. Vancouver came in a distant second at 11.9 while Sydney took third place at 11. Melbourne at 9.5 and Los Angeles
Hit by unrest and recession, Hong Kong remains king of unaffordable housing
China’s Greater Bay Area plan fails to win over young Hongkongers, says survey
In the southern Chinese province of Guangdong, a hiring plan has been submitted aiming to win the hearts and minds of young people in Hong Kong. But a new survey suggests that's a tough mission.  Gordon Lam, a Hong Kong member of the Guangdong Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference, submitted a proposal to the advisory body calling on the provincial government to set up an employment support agency for Hong Kong students. He also said a government liaison body should “provide them with financial subsidies and referral information” so the students can “help service the development of the Greater Bay Area.”  The Greater Bay Area plan is a grand vision by Beijing to turn nine Pearl
China’s Greater Bay Area plan fails to win over young Hongkongers, says survey
Head of human rights group denied entry to Hong Kong
Hong Kong immigration authorities denied entry to the head of Human Rights Watch at the city’s international airport on Sunday, according to the group. Kenneth Roth, the group’s executive director, said in a report on its website that immigration officials told him he could not enter Hong Kong when he landed at the airport from New York, without explaining why. The American citizen planned to visit the city and launch the New York-based organization’s “World Report 2020,” with a lead essay on the Chinese government’s “assault” on the international human rights system. “I had hoped to spotlight Beijing’s deepening assault on international efforts to uphold human rights,” Roth said. “The refus
Head of human rights group denied entry to Hong Kong
One in three Hongkongers are traumatized amid unrest, study says
More than 2 million, or almost one in three, adults in Hong Kong have shown symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder during the prolonged civil unrest in the city, a study published in a leading medical journal has found. The number was six times higher than four years ago, just after the pro-democracy Umbrella Revolution protests had ended. Researchers urged the government to step up its mental health provisions. The research, conducted by the University of Hong Kong, also suggested that up to 11% of the city’s adult population was affected by probable depression last year, five times higher than the figure collected from 2009 to 2014, when it was just 2%. The research, published in an ar
One in three Hongkongers are traumatized amid unrest, study says
Top students debate Hong Kong. Then they want nothing to do with it
Would China grant Hong Kong universal suffrage? This is a question that some participants in the world’s largest university debating tournament do not want to be associated with. At the World Universities Debating Championships (WUDC), a motion on Hong Kong democracy has caused a stir. Mainland Chinese spectators were said to have walked out, while the winning team asked for their names to be removed from the record.  Four teams, from Oxford University, Yale University, the University of Belgrade in Serbia and Macquarie University in Australia, were competing in the final round of WUDC 2020 held in Thailand on January 3.  But after the motion “This House, as China, would grant universal suff
Top students debate Hong Kong. Then they want nothing to do with it
Here’s why Beijing’s new Hong Kong envoy was a surprise choice
Bringing a political veteran with no relevant experience out of semi-retirement and making him the top envoy to Hong Kong shows Beijing’s determination to reset its policy on the city, according to insiders and observers. Luo Huining’s appointment as the new director of the central government’s liaison office in Hong Kong came as a surprise even to Communist Party insiders. But while he is seen as capable, he was an unlikely candidate for the job. Having turned 65 in October, Luo was supposed to be easing into semi-retirement. Under party rules, senior officials of Luo’s rank are relieved from key positions at the age of 65.  They are then transferred to less demanding roles – usually in Chi
Here’s why Beijing’s new Hong Kong envoy was a surprise choice