The Hong Kong protests in 2019 began in opposition to a proposed extradition law that would have allowed the transfer of fugitives to mainland China, among other jurisdictions. The demonstrations have

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Protesters target Hong Kong malls for ‘Christmas shopping’
Hong Kong malls were the target of "Christmas shopping" protests on Sunday.  After more than 6 months of demonstrations, the city had seen a relatively calm period, but on this day riot police once again entered shopping malls after businesses were vandalized. Multiple arrests were made and there was a heavy police presence on the streets. Rallies from both sides of the divide took place near each other in the early afternoon. Thousands attended a pro-police rally and hundreds of social workers called for their colleagues to go on strike in support of the protest movement.
Protesters target Hong Kong malls for ‘Christmas shopping’
The year the Chinese propaganda machine failed spectacularly
If President Xi Jinping’s team carries out annual job appraisals, China’s overseas propaganda team will surely be found to have performed catastrophically.  Whether it is Hong Kong or Xinjiang, Huawei or the trade war with the United States, the Chinese regime has had a string of notable public relations failures this year. While the regime’s propaganda efforts have worked quite well on the domestic audience, mainly because of the Great Firewall, the overseas propaganda arm has suffered major defeats.  Despite deploying numerous resources via official and unofficial channels, the regime has not only failed to achieve its intended purpose of interacting well with the rest of the world but als
The year the Chinese propaganda machine failed spectacularly
Hong Kong protesters get most votes in Time’s Person of the Year
Time has awarded its 2019 Person of the Year to Swedish climate change activist Greta Thunberg. A readers’ poll by the magazine, though, picked one of the finalists, Hong Kong protesters, as the winner with more than 30% of the 27 million votes. When the Time poll opened last month, thousands of Hong Kong protesters and supporters rallied online to vote for themselves, hoping the Person of the Year title would help support their movement. Even after Thunberg was announced as the winner, Hong Kong protesters flooded social media to draw attention to their cause. Since June, when the protests began, demonstrators have sought to advocate their demands for greater accountability and democracy to
Hong Kong protesters get most votes in Time’s Person of the Year
Foreign experts quit watchdog group investigating Hong Kong police
Foreign experts advising Hong Kong’s police watchdog have abruptly announced they will “stand aside” from an ongoing review of officers’ actions during the anti-government protests. Last month, the five-member panel of overseas experts convened by the Independent Police Complaints Council (IPCC) said the watchdog should be given more powers to conduct its own investigation over officers’ conduct during the protests. But council chairman Anthony Neoh, who had enlisted the members, all international experts with years of experience in policing and crowd behavior, rejected their proposal. In an interview with a mainland Chinese media organization, Neoh criticized them for a lack of understandin
Foreign experts quit watchdog group investigating Hong Kong police
Hong Kong police say bombers planned to target officers at weekend rally
Detectives in Hong Kong investigating the seizure of two powerful home-made bombs at a school campus believe they were intended for an attack on police at a democracy march that happened at the weekend, sources said on Tuesday. The apparent bomb plot, revealed amid long-running anti-government unrest, prompted a police union to describe the city’s security situation as at its “most alarming” in decades, even worse than during a wave of armed robberies in the 1990s. Force insiders believed the would-be bombers were forced to abandon the attack planned for Sunday after a group of their associates were arrested in a police swoop that morning, hours before the march – which attracted hundreds of
Hong Kong police say bombers planned to target officers at weekend rally
How comedy and protests helped me find my Hong Kong identity
“Get lost gweilo!” says the old man. I firmly respond, “How dare you call me gweilo! Be respectful and call me ah-cha!”  If you got this joke, then you have a local understanding of racism in Hong Kong.  (For those who don’t get it, gweilo is a Cantonese term for white people while ah-cha refers to South Asians.)  I’m an Indian made in Hong Kong. And because I was born and raised here, my parents felt it was vital that I learn the local language of Cantonese. They wanted me to better integrate into society and avoid the limitations they faced due to their own language barrier. It seemed like a simple formula: Learn the language, become a local, everybody’s happy.  However, as we realized in
How comedy and protests helped me find my Hong Kong identity
China imposes sanctions after Trump signs democracy act
China has suspended visits by US military vessels and aircraft to Hong Kong, and sanctioned several US-based organizations, a few days after US President Donald Trump signed a law increasing scrutiny of the city. Beijing said it was sanctioning US-based non-government organizations, such as Human Rights Watch, alleging they are “supporting violent activities” in the city.  
China imposes sanctions after Trump signs democracy act
Chinese city backs down after protests (No, it’s not Hong Kong)
Authorities in a southern Chinese city have suspended plans to build a crematorium following two days of clashes between riot police and residents in scenes that drew comparisons to the continuing unrest in Hong Kong. The clashes in Wenlou, which is about 60 miles north of Hong Kong, began on Thursday when hundreds of locals tried to march on the town’s government offices in protest against plans to build a crematorium on land they believed had been set aside for a park. But police intervened, firing tear gas and using batons to fend off the crowds. Dozens of people were injured and as many as 100 were detained, witnesses said. Authorities in Huazhou, Guangdong province, issued a notice late
Chinese city backs down after protests (No, it’s not Hong Kong)
K-pop star ‘liked’ a tweet about Hong Kong. His Chinese fans are not amused
K-pop singer Choi Siwon — from the popular boy band Super Junior — has apologized to his 16 million Chinese fans for “liking” a post on Twitter about the Hong Kong protests. Choi, 33, liked – and later unliked – a Tweet from the South Korean newspaper Chosun on Sunday which linked to an interview with Chow Pak-kwan, the 21-year-old Hong Kong protester who was shot by a police officer at point-blank range on November 11.  Mainland internet users called for Choi to leave Super Junior. He is another public figure from the Asian entertainment world who has sparked an online backlash from nationalistic Chinese over alleged support for the anti-government protests in Hong Kong. Many commenters on
K-pop star ‘liked’ a tweet about Hong Kong. His Chinese fans are not amused