Intellectual property in China

Intellectual property in China

After KFG and Plada, Chinese lookalike sparks ‘disgust’
Chinese brand “Cherlss & Keich” has denied it was a copycat, after consumers complained of being tricked by its close resemblances with Singaporean fast-fashion brand Charles & Keith. On the Twitter-like Weibo, some users said they shopped at stores that looked almost the same as Charles & Keith’s only to find the brand name on the products was spelled differently.  The Cherlss & Keich brand is run by a leather product company in the southern city of Guangzhou. In photos posted on social media, the designs of its products, shopping bags and the storefronts all bear close resemblances to those of the Singaporean brand.  But an employee at Cherlss & Keich denied the company had copied from th
Who’s that in the logo? Trademark case claims $30 million in damages
It is an image that is easy to find across China. A martial artist, wearing a yellow jumpsuit, is holding up his arms ready to attack or defend. You could be forgiven if you drove by and thought it was a picture of the kung fu star Bruce Lee. But technically, it is not. It is the logo of a famous Chinese fast-food chain called Real Kungfu.  The company has been using the logo for 15 years, but now it is facing a lawsuit from Bruce Lee’s family.  The lawsuit is the latest example in a series of trademark disputes between Chinese companies and international celebrities.  Bruce Lee Enterprises, run by Lee’s daughter Shannon Lee, is suing the restaurant chain for 210 million yuan ($30 million).
A tech dispute that is bigger than the US-China rivalry
The White House and Beijing have reached an agreement on a “phase one” trade deal with most of the last-minute attention focused on agricultural purchases and tariff reductions. Among the key structural issues that may not have been adequately addressed is Washington’s concern about theft of intellectual property rights, which, according to President Donald Trump, costs the nation $600 billion annually, an accusation denied by China. Many in America’s security establishment also see China’s aggressive actions as part of broader efforts to erode America’s great power status. Thus, the transfer of technology to China is viewed not only on its commercial merits but also as a potential national
Alarm in US over China’s recruitment of scientists
The Federal Bureau of Investigation has deployed counter-intelligence agents in all 56 US field offices and centralized efforts to thwart China’s aggressive theft of strategic secrets and its recruitment of American scientists, according to Senate testimony on Tuesday. Field offices are command posts spread across American cities that are used to carry out local and regional operations.  “Technology is the key to military and economic power,” John Brown, assistant director of the FBI’s counter-intelligence division, told the US Senate’s Homeland Security and Government Affairs Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations. “Time and again the Communist Party has shown that it will do whatever is
Samsung announces collab with Supreme. One problem: it’s a fake brand
Any marketing person worth their salt knows it’s not a product launch without a surprise or two. So when Samsung launched its new Galaxy A8s smartphone in Beijing on Monday, it thought it had a real win: a crossover sure to bring in that coveted 18-35 demographic.   The tech giant had announced a collaboration with none other than streetwear brand Supreme. But it didn’t take long for fans to discover that the partnership was not with the New York skateboard brand – but with a company that makes counterfeit Supreme gear. Meet the CEOs Towards the end of the launch event, Samsung China’s head of digital marketing Feng En invited two men on stage. He introduced them as the CEOs of Supreme. Th