International Women's Day

International Women's Day

International Women's Day is marked on the 8th of March every year. The first observance of the Women's Day was in 1909 in New York as a remembrance of the 1908 strike of the International Ladies' Gar

Show more
Taiwan’s shameful lack of women’s rights
It’s been a good week or so for Taiwan, where I was born. My heart burst as I watched the crowd of more than 40,000 supporters packing the streets of Taipei as they celebrated Taiwan's legalization of same-sex marriage. But the parade that celebrated a monumental advancement in Taiwan’s history left a small feeling of discomfort within. I had been in Taipei in early March, and attended the annual Women’s Day March, which aimed to highlight issues including gender violence, social inequality and reproductive rights. It was attended by around 100 people. The discrepancy in numbers troubled me. Why is there such a stigma in Taiwan about highlighting women’s rights? Crystal Liu, the founder of T
Taiwan’s shameful lack of women’s rights
How one of China’s ‘Feminist Five’ is fighting for women’s rights, even after jail
The day before International Women’s Day in 2015, women's rights activist Wu Rongrong was dragged off a plane from Shenzhen and taken to a police station in the eastern Chinese city of Hangzhou. She was locked up for 37 days, interrogated by day and left to sleep on the floor at night. And all because she planned to hold up signs at local bus stops to protest pervasive sexual harassment on public transport.  “The police officers asked me ‘why are you against sexual harassment?’,” Wu recalls. “I told them: ‘it is a real problem, and I’m scared of it.’” ​ The detention of Wu and four other female activists ahead of International Women’s Day triggered an international outcry, with US and Europ
How one of China’s ‘Feminist Five’ is fighting for women’s rights, even after jail
Girls’ Day stirs sexism debate
Tomorrow is International Women’s Day – and you'd better believe Inkstone will mark the occasion.  But many Chinese people would rather celebrate Girls’ Day, which is today.  Why? Because they don't want to be called "women" – they say it sounds old.  Girls' Day, or Nusheng Jie in Mandarin, first became popular in Chinese universities in 2010.  Subject: love you; grade: 4.0. Tsinghua University banner Fans of the concept say nu sheng – literally “female students” in Chinese – is preferable to fu nu, or “women,” which refers to older, married women.  Traditionally, on Girls’ Day, college boys put up red banners and sing the praises of their female peers. Walking around Chinese campuses on Mar
Girls’ Day stirs sexism debate