Legislative Council of Hong Kong

Legislative Council of Hong Kong

The Legislative Council of Hong Kong is made up of 70 members who debate and pass bills. Half of the Legco members are directly elected by voters in geographical constituencies and the remaining 35 me

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A stench of disapproval, but Hong Kong passes national anthem law
Hong Kong’s legislature has passed a contentious bill that will make it illegal to insult the Chinese national anthem, despite attempts by opposition lawmakers to disrupt the vote. The Legislative Council voted 41 to one to pass the legislation on Thursday after foul-smelling liquid was twice released in the chamber and all but one of the city’s “pan-democrat” bloc stood up and abstained from voting in protest. Under the bill, anyone found guilty of misusing or insulting March of the Volunteers, the name of China's anthem, could be jailed for three years or fined up to $6,500. A special administrative region of China that enjoys a degree of autonomy, Hong Kong operates independently in matte
Hong Kong’s protests look like they’re coming back
Hong Kong’s protest leaders have vowed to return to the city’s streets after the arrest of 15 leading opposition figures amid new claims that Beijing was interfering in the city’s internal affairs. The 15 were accused of organizing and taking part in unauthorized marches in August and October last year as part of a wave of anti-government demonstrations that swept the city, initially triggered by a now-withdrawn extradition bill. Their supporters said the arrests were meant to silence dissent and are worried the authorities are hardening their stance, but pro-Beijing figures countered that the police were only doing their job and were not acting politically. Those arrested were former lawmak
What now for Hong Kong’s democracy candidates after upset?
In a rare upset, a pro-democracy politician in Hong Kong lost at the voting booths to his pro-Beijing rival over the weekend. It's a surprise because until Sunday, pro-democracy candidates had always won in head-to-head polls of this kind. In a somber press conference on Monday, election campaigners bowed to apologize for the defeat. It's a setback for the city's democracy movement, right? Well, yes – and no. Let us explain. What election? Nearly a million voters across Hong Kong went to the polls on Sunday to elect four people to the city's 70-strong legislature.  The elections – technically by-elections – were held to fill four of six empty seats. There had been vacancies after the govern
Look who’s not running in Hong Kong’s elections
To understand the outsized importance of the elections in Hong Kong this Sunday, think outside of the ballot box. The elections will return just four of the 70 seats in the city's legislature, but the result will reflect whether voters approve of Hong Kong's crackdown against a political opposition that demands greater democracy. "This is not an ordinary vote," said Agnes Chow, a prominent democracy activist. "This is a chance for Hong Kong voters to send a message to the government and to the world that they want democracy." Chow was among several candidates that the Beijing-backed local government disqualified in January from standing in the Sunday elections, prompting an international out