The latest mental health news including well-being, depression, mindfulness and mental health resources.

One in three Hongkongers are traumatized amid unrest, study says
More than 2 million, or almost one in three, adults in Hong Kong have shown symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder during the prolonged civil unrest in the city, a study published in a leading medical journal has found. The number was six times higher than four years ago, just after the pro-democracy Umbrella Revolution protests had ended. Researchers urged the government to step up its mental health provisions. The research, conducted by the University of Hong Kong, also suggested that up to 11% of the city’s adult population was affected by probable depression last year, five times higher than the figure collected from 2009 to 2014, when it was just 2%. The research, published in an ar
One in three Hongkongers are traumatized amid unrest, study says
This AI bot scans social media to help prevent suicides
Wang Le’s bedroom is dim and silent, the curtains tightly drawn. The only sounds come from mouse clicks and a clattering keyboard. Wang has a social phobia that has made it challenging to live and work like a normal person for nearly a decade. The internet has been his only connection to the outside world.  It even saved his life. Wang’s phobia was so severe that, to feed himself, he had to rely on his relatives to leave food at his front gate. Even ordering takeout by phone was overwhelming.  In the spring, he contemplated suicide but hesitated. Afraid of death, but also afraid of life, he shared his despair on Weibo, a popular Twitter-like social platform in China. “Are you OK?” a stranger
This AI bot scans social media to help prevent suicides
Air China incident highlights stigma against mental illness
China is embroiled in a debate about whether people with a history of mental illness should be allowed to use public transportation, which was sparked by an incident last week at Air China. The airline was criticized after an off-duty employee made a scene during a flight and accused three passengers of attacking her, leading them to be questioned by police for hours after their arrival in Beijing. Later, it emerged that the employee had bipolar disorder. The passengers were eventually released. On China’s Twitter-like Weibo, a poll titled “Should mentally ill patients be allowed to take a flight?” gathered 85,000 votes by Thursday. About 55% of the respondents voted “no,” saying that patie
 Air China incident highlights stigma against mental illness