Mobile gaming

Mobile gaming

Capable of rendering console-quality graphics and with access to a library of hundreds of thousands of games from around the world, mobile gaming is taking over. US gamers alone spent more than US$2.6

billion on smartphone games and in-app downloads in 2014.

China’s super-sized mobile app market
Every Tuesday and Thursday, Inkstone Index features a single, illuminating number that helps you make sense of China. 3.67 million: how many mobile apps are available in the Chinese market. Chinese app stores featured 3.67 million mobile apps as of December 2019, according to the state-run China Internet Network Information Center.  Games accounted for a quarter of the products, while apps that served as everyday tools made up 14% and e-commerce apps comprised 10% of the market, the data shows. This massive app economy is supported by the world’s biggest internet population – 904 million people in China regularly access the internet, mostly using their phones. But China’s internet is a walle
Game developer’s sexual comments spark gender debate
A series of vulgar remarks from the founder of a Chinese gaming company has ignited a debate about the persistent mistreatment of female gamers and sparked calls for a boycott. On the day his company released a trailer for a much-anticipated new game, Feng Ji said it had attracted so many job applicants that he had been “licked so much that [he] could no longer get erected.” In another post about the trailer, Feng said, “Now I feel pressure in my pants!" The trailer for the game, called Black Myth: Wukong, generated buzz in the gaming community with breathtaking animations. Feng’s posts may jeopardize the commercial success of the game, which has no release date yet. The comments sparked a
New China mobile gaming rules have echoes of the past
For kids in China hoping to invite over their friends, order some food and play video games on their phones until the sun rises, they may have to find another hobby. This week, the Chinese government issued new rules in an effort to tackle online gaming addiction among minors. In doing so, regulators placed a slew of restrictions on the mobile gaming industry for people under the age of 18.  While the rules may sound shocking, they actually follow a pattern that was applied to PC and console gaming years before.  “In general China always tries to balance its core social values with economic growth. They’ve always been paternal in terms of [gaming] policies and regulations,” said Daniel Ahmad
How I fell for my virtual Chinese bae
It’s taken me one week to fall for my virtual Chinese boyfriend. His name is Xu Mo. Aged 26, he stands five feet, nine inches tall. He’s a charismatic and thoughtful neuroscientist, with violet eyes beneath a mane of floppy hair. Xu Mo is one of four fantasy boyfriends offered to players like me on Love and Producer, one of China’s hottest new mobile games. The story follows my anime-inspired avatar as she tries to keep her media production company afloat by inviting star guests onto her TV shows. Love and Producer is an otome game (otome means girl in Japanese) that aims to entice young women with idealized boyfriends and an adventure-filled plot. The male characters all have that Westerniz