Mount Everest

Mount Everest

Mount Everest just grew overnight (on paper at least)
The world’s tallest mountain just grew by either three or 14 feet, depending on if you ask Nepal or China.   Mount Everest’s overnight growth spurt occurred after China and Nepal finally settled a long-running disagreement over the precise dimensions of the mountain. Prior to this week, Nepal had measured Everest at 29,028ft from a 1954 survey, while China had recorded it in 2005 as about 29,017ft.  Neither could agree on the height, with Nepal insisting the snowcap should be included. China was adamant the calculations should be limited to the rock base.  The dispute was rekindled in 2015 when geologists suggested the snowcap may have shrunk by a few centimeters after a magnitude 8.1 earth
Inch perfect: the team trying to fix Everest’s exact height
Chinese surveyors and climbers hope to scale the summit of Mount Everest on Wednesday in the latest attempt to measure the precise height of the world’s tallest mountain. The last such survey in 2005 fixed its height at 8,844.43 meters (29,017.2 feet), but advances in technology over the past 15 years should allow for a more precise calculation this time around. By Sunday, the 12-strong expedition team had reached a camp a little more than a mile from the summit, Chinese state news agency Xinhua said on Monday. Severe weather has scuppered two previous attempts to reach the top this month, the second of them on Friday last week. The mountain lies in the Himalayas on the border between China
China requires Everest climbers to carry their waste out with them
The Mount Everest base camp in Tibet will be closed to all tourists until further notice – in order to fight sky-high litterbugs. The base camps of the world’s highest mountain – one on the Nepalese side, one on the Chinese – are popular tourist destinations in their own right. But now tourists have been indefinitely blocked from visiting the Tibetan camp (the Nepalese camp remains open).  Only people with climbing permits will be allowed to ascend to the Tibetan base camp, at an altitude of 17,000 feet. And these climbers will be required to meet stricter rules to protect the environment, an official from the Chinese Mountaineering Association (CMA) told the South China Morning Post. Ci Lu