These apps want to beat China’s censorship by turning words into a mess
Chinese people angered at the authorities’ handling of the coronavirus outbreak are trying to speak their minds online by obfuscating their messages.  Social media posts composed of dashes and dots as well as out-of-order words have cropped up on the Chinese internet after the death of Dr Li Wenliang. The doctor was chided by Chinese police in December for alerting others to a possible outbreak. His death from the virus has become a symbol of the Chinese government’s botched response to early reports of the disease now known as Covid-19. “The epidemic exposed the harm caused by censorship of speech to the people and the country,” Shu Song, a California-based Chinese developer who created a w
These apps want to beat China’s censorship by turning words into a mess
Did the US overreact to the coronavirus outbreak?
The outbreak of a new coronavirus in China has added a new and intensifying source of tension to an already fractured relationship with the United States. With threats to public health, transport and the global economy looming, it was no surprise that the two countries would clash as the epidemic that apparently started at a seafood and live animal market in the central Chinese city of Wuhan spread to the US, among other countries. But the mysteries of a coronavirus that jumps species to find a home in humans – also known as a zoonotic disease – has opened a new, acrimonious rip into bilateral ties that were already tearing apart. It has pitted science against politics. Amid confusion among
Did the US overreact to the coronavirus outbreak?
China looks ready to ban wildlife trade
The Chinese government is expected to fast-track a ban on the trade and consumption of wild animals after the practice was linked to the Covid-19 outbreak. On Monday the official news agency Xinhua reported that the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress, China’s highest legislative body, would review the ban at a meeting on February 24. The committee will also discuss the decision to postpone the annual legislative session that had been due to take place in early March. Trading and consumption of wild animals has been practiced in China for centuries but has been blamed for helping to spread the coronavirus that causes Covid-19, the disease which has so far infected more than
China looks ready to ban wildlife trade
Knife-wielding robbers steal 600 rolls of toilet paper in Hong Kong
Armed robbers stole 600 rolls of toilet paper from outside a Hong Kong supermarket on Monday, as panic buying over the spread of the coronavirus showed little signs of easing. Three masked men stole the toilet paper wrapped in about 50 packets, worth about $206, from a delivery man outside a Wellcome store in Mong Kok at around 6am on Monday. Police said one of the men was armed with two knives. Two people, aged 49 and 54, had been arrested by midday on Monday, and the police said they were hunting down three more people thought to be aged between 20 and 30. The stolen toilet rolls were found in a guest house in the same district, not far from where it was taken.  The incident followed week
Knife-wielding robbers steal 600 rolls of toilet paper in Hong Kong
China’s Hubei province in full lockdown to combat coronavirus outbreak
China’s central province of Hubei, the epicenter of the coronavirus outbreak, has implemented tough travel restrictions. The new rules imposed on February 16, 2020, apply to the province’s entire population of 58 million and restricts all people from leaving their residential communities or villages. Hubei has seen the majority of the over 1,800 deaths worldwide from Covid-19, the illness caused by the new coronavirus.
China’s Hubei province in full lockdown to combat coronavirus outbreak
Needs of female medical workers overlooked in coronavirus fight, advocates say
As the number of coronavirus patients has continued to climb, medical workers in the heart of the outbreak have had to avoid drinking and cross their legs to get through long shifts in their protective suits. But for the many women on the front line of China’s fight against the epidemic, they have also had to deal with menstruation, a need that some female medical professionals said is being overlooked by China’s decision makers. A group of women’s rights advocates is seeking to help by sending hundreds of thousands of pairs of disposable underwear designed for periods to hospitals in the central city of Wuhan, the epicenter of the outbreak. The goal is to help female hospital staff have mor
Needs of female medical workers overlooked in coronavirus fight, advocates say
Xi’s China faces ‘crisis of Chernobyl proportions’
Long before it became synonymous with a viral outbreak, the central Chinese city of Wuhan had been at the heart of some key political events in the country’s modern history. It was where an armed uprising began in 1911 that ended thousands of years of imperial rule. It was where Mao swam across the Yangtze River in 1966, at the age of 72, in a publicity stunt that helped rally support for his Cultural Revolution. This winter, it was the starting point for an outbreak of a new coronavirus – which causes the disease now officially known as Covid-19 – that has rapidly spread across the country and beyond, killing more than 1,380 people and paralyzing cities. The crisis has been referred to as C
Xi’s China faces ‘crisis of Chernobyl proportions’
Voices from China: How many ‘really died’ from coronavirus and how survivors live
The march of the coronavirus has shown little signs of stopping. The virus has sickened at least 64,440 people and killed 1,380 worldwide since the outbreak was first reported in late December. But while the disease’s footprint has spread to over 24 countries, its toll has been concentrated in mainland China, where all except 3 deaths have been reported. For many people living in the heart of the epidemic, fending off the virus remains a priority. As whole cities are sealed off and public transportation shut down, millions of people have no choice but to stay home, wondering how much more damage the coronavirus will cause before it ends – if it ends. Their experience is almost without preced
Voices from China: How many ‘really died’ from coronavirus and how survivors live