Nuclear family

Nuclear family

Calling all dads: lobby group demands men step up to childcare challenge
A women’s lobby group has called for legislation making parental leave for new dads mandatory in a bid to reverse China’s plummeting birthrate. Forcing fathers to be more involved in child care would boost gender equality and encourage more women to have children, said the Shanghai Women’s Federation (SWF) on the social media platform WeChat last month. Apart from the existing 128-day maternity leave and 10-day paternity leave, the SWF wants to add a shared parental leave policy that requires fathers to take at least a third of it, the organization said. “We hope that families would be encouraged by the public policies [to have children], without adding burdens to employers or worsening chi
Chinese woman receives payment for housework in divorce ruling
Dividing housework can be one of the most divisive disagreements in a marriage, and one woman in China managed to get paid for the chores she performed during a 5-year-long marriage.  The legal judgment, the first of its kind in China, has sparked heated debate about putting a monetary value on unpaid work – still mostly done by women – at home.  During a divorce proceeding starting in 2020, the court awarded the ex-wife, surnamed Wang, a US$7,700 one time payment for housework she had done during the marriage.  Wang said her husband, named Chen, had not taken part in housework or childcare when they were together. She also accused Chen of having an affair. Zhong Wen, a divorce lawyer based
A single mother didn't receive maternity benefits. So she sued
Being a single mother is difficult enough, but contradictory laws in China also mean that unmarried women do not enjoy government schemes aimed at helping new parents start their families on the right foot.  One single mother’s failed attempt to fight for her insurance subsidies spotlighted the regulatory hurdles single mothers in China have to overcome to raise their kids. For Chris Zou, a three-year odyssey through the Chinese court system, left her exactly where she had started: tasked with raising her three-year-old son without government help. Married couples in China are entitled to maternity insurance and a subsidy program that provides financial aid after their child is born. It’s a