Shaolin martial arts

Shaolin martial arts

How Jet Li turned the Shaolin Temple into a cash cow
You may know Jet Li from such films as 2000’s Romeo Must Die, but the film that launched his career in Asia was Shaolin Temple. What’s not widely known is that the 1982 movie also essentially created Shaolin kung fu as we know it. The actual Shaolin Temple is now a Unesco World Heritage Site, and the heart of tourism in central China’s Henan province. Scores of martial arts schools lie on a mountain. Ticket sales bring in tens of millions of dollars a year.  But when a film crew from Hong Kong’s Chung Yuen Motion Picture Company turned up in 1980, they found an abandoned site in disrepair after decades of neglect. “When I was working in Shaolin there were no monks... only three monks... and
How Jet Li turned the Shaolin Temple into a cash cow
How Shaolin Temple survived every attempt to destroy it
When the Notre Dame Cathedral was burning in Paris last month, some Chinese wasted no time in venting their Schadenfreude online. According to their logic, the fiery destruction of a cultural symbol beloved by the French was vindication for the burning and looting of Beijing’s Summer Palace by French and British troops in 1860. In fairness, these jingoistic rants were roundly criticized by many, including China’s heritage and other government bodies, as mean-spirited, misguided and childish. Named for its location in the forest of Mount Shaoshi, in central Henan province, Shaolin Temple is among the most venerated religious edifices in China. And like Notre Dame and many cultural monuments a
How Shaolin Temple survived every attempt to destroy it