Sichuan earthquake, 10 years on

Sichuan earthquake, 10 years on

On May 12, 2008, a magnitude-8 earthquake hit the Sichuan region leaving 87,000 dead, 370,000 injured and 5 million homeless. The quake-prone area has suffered many tremors since, including a magnitud

e-7 quake on August 8, 2017 which left 24 dead and 493 injured.

Did poor construction doom 5,000 kids in the Sichuan quake?
Official statistics say that more than five thousand students died after schools collapsed during the 2008 Sichuan earthquake. Unofficial counts put the number far higher. Ten years on, families grieving the loss of their only children are still seeking the reasons behind the collapse of so many schools.
Did poor construction doom 5,000 kids in the Sichuan quake?
The quake that ripped apart China’s dream
By all accounts, 2008 was a banner year for China. For the first time, China was hosting the Olympic Games, that badge of honor that separated what comedian Ali Wong calls “jungle Asian” from “fancy Asian.” “The fancy Asians are the Chinese, the Japanese. They get to do fancy things like host Olympics. Jungle Asians host …diseases.” sniffs Wong. Indeed, in five short years China made the leap from hosting the SARS epidemic to hosting its coming-out party, which was what media had dubbed the Beijing Olympics. The event, set to launch on the auspicious 8.8.08, would mark a milestone for an increasingly open China, one with a burgeoning market for investigative journalism, an active blogosphere
The quake that ripped apart China’s dream
A decade-long search for justice on student deaths
Ten years after a massive earthquake hit Sichuan, many Chinese are still wondering if the thousands of students killed under the rubble of schoolrooms could have survived. “It could only be human error that the school would crumble into pieces,” said pig farmer Sang Jun, 49, whose 11-year-old son, along with 125 other pupils, died in a primary school in the city of Mianzhu. The more than 7,000 schools destroyed in the tremors became the deadliest places to be in the 2008 quake. More than 5,300 schoolchildren were killed in the quake by the official count, although parents and activists have put the figure at closer to 10,000. The devastating casualties immediately prompted questions over th
A decade-long search for justice on student deaths
How the Sichuan quake damaged charity in China
Sichuan province has been steadily rebuilding after the devastating 2008 earthquake. But one dark spot has marred the success of China’s reconstruction efforts after the disaster. In the wake of the national tragedy, China received an outpouring of help and support from around the world. Within a month after the quake, the country had received $7 billion in donations. By the end of 2009, the figure had reached almost $42 billion, according to the National Audit Office. But not all the money was properly managed. Many of the funds were not used as intended, with thousands of complaints about corrupt or improper official behavior in the handling of quake relief funds. And the resulting scanda
How the Sichuan quake damaged charity in China
Lost and found: How survivors of the Sichuan earthquake rebuilt their lives
No one in China’s Sichuan province had any idea that their lives would be forever changed on May 12, 2008. On that fateful day, the southwestern province was hit by a magnitude-8 earthquake. 87,000 people lost their lives, and homes and schools were reduced to rubble. Those who survived lost almost everything, and had to rebuild their lives from scratch. These three survivors told us what happened to them after the disaster. Miracle Baby Pan Xiaoai, 10, knew little of what her mother, Zhang Xiaoyan, went through to give birth to her. At that time, Pan’s parents were living in a government-built block on the outskirts of Chengdu, a city perhaps best known for its pandas. When the earthquake
Lost and found: How survivors of the Sichuan earthquake rebuilt their lives
Practical lessons from an earthquake that devastated China
The 2008 Sichuan earthquake claimed 87,000 lives. But as many as 30,000 of them could have been saved if the region had had an early warning system, according to a Chinese government-backed earthquake research center, the Institute of Care-Life. Since then, China has invested heavily in studying earthquakes to minimize casualties and devastation.  Here’s what the country has learned. Warn early After the 2008 quake, the national earthquake administration injected $300 million (2 billion yuan) into developing an early-warning and rapid-intensity reporting system to detect and alert people to quakes seconds before they strike. The system – similar to ones used in quake-prone countries like Jap
Practical lessons from an earthquake that devastated China