Social media

Social media

Social media refers to the means of interaction among people in which they create, share, and exchange information and ideas in virtual communities and networks. Social media depends on mobile and web

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Chinese companies can create the next Clubhouse, just not in China
The surging popularity of Clubhouse has many people asking if it will take the mantle as the next up-and-coming startup, and Chinese companies see an opportunity to take advantage of the business model.  Just not in China.  Macro Lai Jinnan, the founder and CEO of Lizhi, a Chinese podcasting app, said in an interview with the  South China Morning Post that Clubhouse-like apps are unlikely to succeed in China because of the country’s strict content regulations, but he believes Chinese companies are still well-positioned to capitalize the new social audio app craze in other countries. “It will be very difficult to create a Clubhouse-like app in China. The form of Clubhouse will most likely be
Sun sets as Clubhouse blocked in China
Clubhouse, the US audio-chat app that had briefly provided a forum for mainland Chinese residents to speak openly about sensitive topics, became inaccessible in the country on Monday evening.  The app had proliferated quickly in China, and it garnered international attention for its online discussions of issues such as the Hong Kong protests, Xinjiang re-education camps and relations with Taiwan.  Users in China said they are unable to connect to the servers of Clubhouse and can only access the service through a virtual private network.  Users have also reported that they cannot receive verification codes via mainland China mobile phone numbers, which is currently the only way to onboard th
Clubhouse in China is a party that knows the cops are coming
UPDATE: Multiple media outlets are reporting that Clubhouse went offline in China on the evening of February 8.  Clubhouse, the hottest new social media app from Silicon Valley, is the talk of the town in mainland China because it has emerged as a rare space to discuss sensitive topics freely.  On China’s largest e-commerce platform, Taobao, a search using the keywords “clubhouse invitation” in Chinese generated more than two dozen results. An online shop in Shanghai, boldly calling itself “clubhouse invitation code,” has sold more than 200 invitations in the last month, with codes priced up to US$50. For users in mainland China, the app, which doesn’t support text or video, has offered a fr
Li Ziqi is the queen of China influencers
She grew famous for portraying an idyllic rural lifestyle in China, she courted controversy by cooking “kimchi,” and now she has been crowned the undisputed queen of Chinese-language YouTube.  Li Ziqi has set a record for “Most subscribers for a Chinese- language channel on YouTube,” Guinness World Records announced on Weibo, China’s Twitter-like service on Tuesday night. Li had 14.2 million followers on YouTube as of early February. She launched her YouTube channel in 2017, with a video on making a dress out of grape skins.  “The poetic and idyllic lifestyle and the exquisite traditional Chinese culture shown in Li’s videos have attracted fans from all over the world, with many YouTubers co
New social media rules target cyberbullying, self-publishing
Cyberbullying, inciting emotion or spreading fake news are just some of the activities that will soon be banned on social media in a censorship crackdown by China’s top cyber watchdog. In a fresh fight against fake news and other online activities considered” harmful,” the Cyberspace Administration of China’s strict new censorship rules aim to regulate social media sites to “protect the security of content and maintain a healthy cyberspace.” The rules come into effect on February 22 and could force social media platforms to spend big bucks on policing content, say analysts. In China, the onus falls on platform operators to remove inappropriate content uploaded by users. The regulation chang
Regulate big tech like tobacco or alcohol, says top expert
Tech giants should join the ranks of big tobacco and alcohol corporations in being forced to mitigate the damage done to users, says a New York University professor. Adam Alter, an author and professor of marketing at New York University’s Stern School of Business, believes that modern technology has never been so “efficient and addictive.” He warned that tech companies’ ability to prey on “behavioral addiction” could have devastating long-term effects on the relationships and mental health of users and called out for their protection by making those companies legally responsible. As tobacco and alcohol companies are bound in many countries to warn consumers about the dangers of consuming a
Three of the quirkiest stories to add some whimsy to your 2021
2021 has already proven to be a year of serious historical events, but that does not mean it lacks whimsy.  Here are three of the quirkiest stories from China to start this year.  The tale of a celebrity pig This swine has been through everything, surviving the odds to become a national icon and a sign of Chinese resilience after being buried alive for more than a month in the 2008 Sichuan earthquake. Now, 12 years on, fans of ‘Zhu Jianqiang’ meaning ‘Strong Pig’ are cheering for the survival of the country’s favorite porker, at least until after the Chinese New Year celebrations in February are over. Entering old age, Zhu is struggling to pull her weight and stand without help, spending da
How YouTubers gain fame by defending, or lashing out at Beijing
Lee and Oli Barrett, a father-son duo with a YouTube channel, inhaled two balloons’ worth of helium on May 22 and laughingly thanked online viewers for pushing them past the 100,000 subscriber mark after only 11 months. The key to their rapid audience expansion? Defending China. The Barretts, British citizens based in Shenzhen city neighboring Hong Kong, are not alone in finding that defense of China – or conversely biting criticism of Beijing – can be a fast route to YouTube success. As individuals have taken to YouTube and other non-traditional media platforms to become “influencers” on topics as diverse as fixing a golf swing or making goat cheese, an issue as contentious as the antagonis
Why stylish pedestrians from China are showing up on your feed
Every Tuesday and Thursday, Inkstone Explains unravels the ideas and context behind the headlines to help you understand news about China. Videos of stylish people walking on the streets of China are cropping up on social media out of seemingly nowhere. A couple in matching black and white outfits, paired with a bag by an avant-garde Japanese designer. A buff man wearing a white tank top that exposes his defined biceps, with a guitar bag on his back. A woman dressed in traditional Chinese hanfu and elaborate makeup while holding a fan. The videos have racked up millions of views on TikTok and Twitter in the space of a few months. street fashion in china is a whole nother breed and i love it
News or propaganda? Not all media outlets in China are created equal
Every Tuesday and Thursday, Inkstone Explains unravels the ideas and context behind the headlines to help you understand news about China. In response to growing worries in the US over foreign meddling in elections, American social media companies have taken upon themselves to identify accounts run by foreign governments. YouTube in 2018 began adding labels to state-owned media. Facebook followed suit several months before the 2020 presidential elections, while Twitter has taken the extra step of limiting the spread of posts made by outlets and people affiliated with a foreign government. But blanket labeling of Chinese media as “state-affiliated,” as Twitter does, glosses over the important