Social Media Influencer

Social Media Influencer

Li Ziqi is the queen of China influencers
She grew famous for portraying an idyllic rural lifestyle in China, she courted controversy by cooking “kimchi,” and now she has been crowned the undisputed queen of Chinese-language YouTube.  Li Ziqi has set a record for “Most subscribers for a Chinese- language channel on YouTube,” Guinness World Records announced on Weibo, China’s Twitter-like service on Tuesday night. Li had 14.2 million followers on YouTube as of early February. She launched her YouTube channel in 2017, with a video on making a dress out of grape skins.  “The poetic and idyllic lifestyle and the exquisite traditional Chinese culture shown in Li’s videos have attracted fans from all over the world, with many YouTubers co
A new breed of Chinese KOLs who champion for worthwhile causes
Key opinion leaders, or KOLs, have recently come to dominate the advertising and marketing industry. They are celebrities in themselves, who have managed to gather a massive list of followers to leverage into commercial opportunities for brands and themselves. But a new breed of KOLs in China use their platform to champion worthy causes, ranging from environmentalism to sharing legal and medical knowledge.  Here 5 of the biggest stars.  Liang Yu grew to prominence when she decided to take the lead to help provide female healthcare workers with sanitary products.   The needs of women medical workers, such as access to menstruation pads, were ignored when Covid-19 began spreading throughout W
Chinese blog panned for dissing Australian firefighters
A viral blog that attacked Australia’s failure to stop the months-long bush fires and implied Chinese firefighters were braver and more patriotic has stirred vigorous online debate. The post, published on China’s Facebook-like WeChat, contrasted the situation in Australia with China’s largest-ever wildfire, which lasted just under a month in 1987.  The article quickly racked up more than 23 million views, but was criticized by high-profile media commentators for insensitivity and using nationalism to generate cheap viral clicks. Friday’s article, titled “If it weren’t for the Australian bush fires, I would’ve never known that China was so powerful 33 years ago,” also suggested that Australia
Hong Kong pop star Joey Yung slammed by Chinese fans for surgical mask selfie
A reality of 2019 is that surgical face masks have become ubiquitous across the world. They are commonly used for hygiene, avoiding pollution and, increasingly, fashion. Celebrities like British model Naomi Campbell went viral for her over-the-top airport routine (that involved face masks), while K-pop stars use it as a fashion statement. It can get tricky when the celebrity is from Hong Kong. Cantopop star Joey Yung Cho-yee donned a surgical mask right before a flight and posted a selfie. Mainland Chinese netizens subsequently slammed her for siding with the protest movement in Hong Kong. Facial masks have become a symbol of the anti-government protesters in Hong Kong, many of whom use the
Meet Asia’s ‘granfluencers’
Meet a new type of social media celebrity: the “granfluencer.” They are elderly social stars who are proving that the online world is not an exclusive club for millennials. Adored by millions of people of all ages, the granfluencers are bridging the generation gap as they encourage others their age to embrace the internet. Watch the video above to see how their tips about living an ageless lifestyle are finding plenty of younger fans too.
Why China doesn’t keep up with the Kardashians (or Hadids)
A lack of connection combined with a series of cultural faux pas – and maybe just a touch of arrogance – are costing American social media influencers big when it comes to cracking China. In October last year Kim Kardashian joined Little Red Book (aka Xiaohongshu), a Chinese content and shopping platform that has more than 100 million users. The site's KOLs (key opinion leaders) are extremely powerful, directing consumers straight to the shopping pages. Kardashian has a mere 171,000 followers on the site, a far cry from the 135 million she has on Instagram, which is banned in China. Similarly, American model Karlie Kloss has 394,000 followers on the Chinese site compared to 8 million on Inst