A self-ruled democracy China claims as its own, Taiwan is up against a formidable campaign from Beijing.

US-China ties to get complicated due to elections in Taiwan
Taiwan may face retaliation and increased pressure from Beijing after President Tsai Ing-wen’s landslide re-election victory, analysts said, adding uncertainty to the already tense relationship between China and the US. Tsai, from the independence-leaning Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), won a record-breaking 8.2 million votes, or 57% of the total, in Taiwan’s election on Saturday against 5.5 million votes for her main opponent, Kaohsiung mayor Han Kuo-yu, in what was widely seen as an endorsement of the Tsai administration’s tough stance against Beijing. Observers said Beijing was likely to further squeeze Taiwan – a self-ruled island that Beijing claims as part of its territory – in the
US-China ties to get complicated due to elections in Taiwan
Taiwanese voters share election hopes
In the days before Taiwan voters go to the polls on January 11, 2020, to select their next president, the South China Morning Post interviewed people on the self-ruled island to learn more about what they hope for and expect from their next political leaders.
Taiwanese voters share election hopes
How playing up a ‘sense of crisis’ could keep Taiwan’s president in office
Chemistry student Chen Pin-yu will be voting for the first time when Taiwan heads to the polls in January, and she has already made her choice. “I’ll be giving my vote to Tsai Ing-wen because she is more capable of defending Taiwan than Han Kuo-yu or James Soong,” the 21-year-old, who studies at Tamkang University in Taipei, said. Chen was concerned about the self-ruled island’s fate if President Tsai lost to Han or Soong, whom the student said “would turn a blind eye to Beijing eroding our sovereignty.” Young voters like Chen will be crucial for the three presidential candidates on January 11, analysts say, in an election seen as a choice between protecting the island’s sovereignty and kee
How playing up a ‘sense of crisis’ could keep Taiwan’s president in office
To win over Hong Kong and Taiwan, Xi Jinping must break a 2,000-year tradition
China’s “one country, two systems” formula in Hong Kong is failing miserably. After more than six months of large-scale pro-democracy protests – including violent clashes with police – the city’s voters dealt a powerful blow in November to pro-mainland parties, which lost 87% of seats to pro-democracy rivals in district council elections.  The significance of that election should not be underestimated. While district councils have little power, they select some of the 1,200 electors who choose Hong Kong’s chief executive. In the next election, pro-democracy parties will fill nearly 10% of those seats. The election also had important symbolic implications. District councils are elected in a
To win over Hong Kong and Taiwan, Xi Jinping must break a 2,000-year tradition
Why Indonesians studying Mandarin look to Taiwan
Chinese-Indonesian Eri Widoera, 24, decided to study Mandarin as he saw more Chinese companies entering Indonesia.  “If you can speak Mandarin, Indonesian and English, certainly your competitiveness in the market [will be much higher],” he said. He also felt the need to reconnect with his Chinese roots, even though he describes himself as a proud third-generation Indonesian. In recent years, more Chinese-Indonesians have decided to learn Mandarin and send their children to Chinese-medium schools.  It is a change from the era of dictator Suharto, whose policies to encourage assimilation meant Chinese-owned media outlets were banned and expressions of Chinese culture and language were illegal
Why Indonesians studying Mandarin look to Taiwan
The best (and worst) cities in Asia to live and work abroad
Living abroad can be a life of romance, personal growth and exciting opportunities. Or it can be a nightmare of expensive rent, culture shock and loneliness.  But if you are to take the plunge, Asian cities could be your best bets, according to a recent survey. Four of the top five of the world’s best cities for expatriates to live are in Asia, according to the survey of more than 20,000 expatriates. Taipei, the capital city of Taiwan, topped the chart for the second year in a row. Malaysia’s capital, Kuala Lumpur, came in second while Ho Chi Minh City in Vietnam was third. Singapore was ranked as the fourth-best city for expatriates while Montréal rounded out the top five as the only non-A
The best (and worst) cities in Asia to live and work abroad
Taiwan opens doors to students fleeing Hong Kong turmoil
University students fleeing campus turmoil in Hong Kong can attend lectures at colleges in Taiwan to continue their studies, the Taiwanese authorities said on Wednesday. Students would be allowed to sit in on courses without credits for the rest of the school term, which runs from early December until January 3. “Regardless of whether they are from Taiwan or not, university students in Hong Kong whose studies have been interrupted by the protests in Hong Kong are welcome to register with a number of our universities here if they want to continue their studies,” Taiwan’s Ministry of Education said. Students who want to qualify for a degree would have to apply through the ministry. The offer
Taiwan opens doors to students fleeing Hong Kong turmoil