Life on China’s low-speed trains
China introduced its first high-speed railway service in 2008. But instead of following the “bullet train” craze, photographer Qian Haifeng, a former blue-collar worker, set out to document the country’s old, slow trains.  “I went in the other direction,” says Qian, “Treading the opposite path from the way the nation was supposedly heading, on the slow, obscure services, the cheap old trains without air conditioners – the ‘green trains’.” The green trains are cheap and often delayed. They sometimes have no air conditioning or heating.  The third-class-carriage tables are piled high with sunflower seeds and peanut shells, Qian says. Some long-distance commuters are trying to sleep, heads prop
Life on China’s low-speed trains