Tsai Ing-wen is the president of Taiwan. She took office on May 20, 2016, after her Democratic Progressive Party won a landslide victory over the Beijing-friendly Kuomintang in the presidential electi

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US-China ties to get complicated due to elections in Taiwan
Taiwan may face retaliation and increased pressure from Beijing after President Tsai Ing-wen’s landslide re-election victory, analysts said, adding uncertainty to the already tense relationship between China and the US. Tsai, from the independence-leaning Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), won a record-breaking 8.2 million votes, or 57% of the total, in Taiwan’s election on Saturday against 5.5 million votes for her main opponent, Kaohsiung mayor Han Kuo-yu, in what was widely seen as an endorsement of the Tsai administration’s tough stance against Beijing. Observers said Beijing was likely to further squeeze Taiwan – a self-ruled island that Beijing claims as part of its territory – in the
US-China ties to get complicated due to elections in Taiwan
How playing up a ‘sense of crisis’ could keep Taiwan’s president in office
Chemistry student Chen Pin-yu will be voting for the first time when Taiwan heads to the polls in January, and she has already made her choice. “I’ll be giving my vote to Tsai Ing-wen because she is more capable of defending Taiwan than Han Kuo-yu or James Soong,” the 21-year-old, who studies at Tamkang University in Taipei, said. Chen was concerned about the self-ruled island’s fate if President Tsai lost to Han or Soong, whom the student said “would turn a blind eye to Beijing eroding our sovereignty.” Young voters like Chen will be crucial for the three presidential candidates on January 11, analysts say, in an election seen as a choice between protecting the island’s sovereignty and kee
How playing up a ‘sense of crisis’ could keep Taiwan’s president in office
Taiwan opens doors to students fleeing Hong Kong turmoil
University students fleeing campus turmoil in Hong Kong can attend lectures at colleges in Taiwan to continue their studies, the Taiwanese authorities said on Wednesday. Students would be allowed to sit in on courses without credits for the rest of the school term, which runs from early December until January 3. “Regardless of whether they are from Taiwan or not, university students in Hong Kong whose studies have been interrupted by the protests in Hong Kong are welcome to register with a number of our universities here if they want to continue their studies,” Taiwan’s Ministry of Education said. Students who want to qualify for a degree would have to apply through the ministry. The offer
Taiwan opens doors to students fleeing Hong Kong turmoil
Inkstone answers: what do Hong Kong’s protests mean for Taiwan?
Huge protests have forced Hong Kong’s leader to apologize (twice) over an unpopular extradition bill that many felt could erode the city's autonomy from mainland China. The bill sought to allow Beijing to extradite suspects from the former British colony, which was promised a great deal of autonomy when it returned to Chinese rule. The plan is now dead in all but name after 2 million people took to the streets on Sunday to protest it. But it was not just Hong Kong’s fight, and the fallout has already hit the whole region – in unexpected ways. Patrick, an Inkstone reader at the University of Virginia, asked us how this all played out across the strait in Taiwan. The answers to that could be f
Inkstone answers: what do Hong Kong’s protests mean for Taiwan?
Terry Gou got rich making iPhones. Now he wants to run Taiwan
Taiwanese tycoon Terry Gou, who earned his fortune making iPhones, said on Wednesday that he would run for president of Taiwan after receiving a divine blessing from a sea goddess. Hardly a household name abroad, Gou is well known in Asia for founding the world’s largest contract manufacturer of iPhones and other electronics, Hon Hai Precision Industry, better known by its trading name, Foxconn. By throwing his hat into the ring, Gou looks set to shake up politics on the self-ruled island. Taiwan’s relations with China have come under focus amid a sluggish economy and intensifying rivalry between Beijing and Washington, which considers Taipei a crucial democratic ally in the region. Gou ama
Terry Gou got rich making iPhones. Now he wants to run Taiwan