US-China relations: the Asian angle

US-China relations: the Asian angle

As the world's two greatest powers jostle for economic influence, what does the future have in store for Asia?

Amid wave of Sinophobia, new US museum tells the Chinese-American story
Walking into the yet-to-open Chinese-American Museum in Washington, visitors are greeted with a simple message: “The Chinese-American story is an American story.” Located four blocks north of the White House, the museum hopes to tell the story of the Chinese-American experience, beginning with the first four recorded Chinese visitors who sailed to Baltimore aboard a merchant ship in 1785. “Chinese are not recent arrivals,” said the museum’s executive director, David Uy, himself a first-generation Chinese-American. “We see ourselves as an American history museum. That’s one of the main points we’re trying to get across.” In the 235 years since those first arrivals set foot in the nascent Unit
US sanctions Chinese firm for ‘seizure’ of Cambodian land
The US Treasury Department issued sanctions on Tuesday against a Chinese company developing a sprawling tourism zone in Cambodia. It is the latest sign that Washington’s increasingly heated competition with Beijing has now spread to Southeast Asia. The Treasury Department accused Union Development Group (UDG) of “seizure and demolition of local Cambodians’ land” for the construction of Dara Sakor, a coastal resort area that is planned to include golf courses, casinos, luxury housing, an airport, and a port large enough for cruise ships. In announcing the sanctions, the US cited reports that Dara Sakor could be converted to host Chinese military assets, which could “threaten regional stabilit