Xi Jinping's anti-corruption campaign

Xi Jinping's anti-corruption campaign

Xi Jinping, Chinese president and general secretary of the Communist Party, launched in 2012 a high-profile campaign targeting party, government, military and state-owned company officials suspected o

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Farming and calligraphy: what China’s fallen political elite do behind bars
Former security tsar Zhou Yongkang was once one of China’s most powerful men. Now, he grows fruit and vegetables inside the “tigers’ cage” – the country’s infamous maximum security jail for fallen political elites. Disgraced Chongqing party boss Bo Xilai and his former police chief Wang Lijun, who were at the center of the country’s biggest political scandal in recent years, do not cross paths at the prison but apparently share the same hobby: calligraphy. More than 1.3 million Chinese officials – from the elite “tigers” to the ordinary “flies” – have been snared since President Xi Jinping took power in 2012 and began an unprecedented graft-busting campaign. And most of the “big tigers” lik
The stunning downfall of China’s internet tsar
Once the ruler of the world’s largest online citizenry, the life of former Chinese internet regulator Lu Wei is fast unraveling. Until he fell from grace, Lu was the former head of the powerful Cyberspace Administration of China, tasked with carrying out President Xi Jinping’s vision for a tightly managed internet. In 2015, Time magazine named him as one of the 100 most influential people in the world, the only Chinese official listed besides Xi. For a man who started his career in public service as a reporter for the state news agency Xinhua, Lu had a good run. He also had a shot to rise to the top brass of Chinese government. But that’s about where his good fortune ended. Lu left his role
A former star politician admits to corruption
A disgraced Chinese politician who has been accused of plotting against the Communist Party pleaded guilty to corruption charges on Thursday.  Sun Zhengcai, 54, the former party chief of the southwestern megacity of Chongqing, was once considered to be a leadership contender who could succeed President Xi Jinping. But he was abruptly sacked and placed under investigation in July last year, three months before Xi was appointed the party chief for a second term. During the trial at the Tianjin No.1 Intermediate People’s Court, prosecutors accused Sun of using his position to seek profits for others and himself, illegally accepting $27 million worth of assets from 2002 to 2017, state-run Xinhua
Will China’s new anti-graft watchdog save the nation – or doom it?
In a controversial move, China has just approved a new law extending the powers of the Communist Party’s internal anti-corruption watchdog to cover millions more people. The law empowers the newly established National Supervisory Commission, as well as its local branches, to oversee a vast number of public sector managers, even if they are not party members. These include the management of state-run: Schools Hospitals Sports organizations Companies Here’s what you need to know. What is China’s fight against corruption? Calling corruption the greatest threat to the Communist regime, President Xi Jinping launched a sweeping anti-graft campaign after he came to power in 2012. The party’s pow
A threat to human rights
Behind its bureaucratic title, China’s new Supervision Law poses a systemic threat to human rights. The law places millions of people at the mercy of an extra-judicial system without the most basic safeguards to protect an individual’s liberty and security. The government has said the new system advantageously replaces the widely criticized and largely informal shuanggui system - an internal disciplinary system of the Chinese Communist Party. Yet it not only fails to address the defects of that arbitrary system which operated in the shadows, but it goes further in expanding powers that are rife for abuse. The law’s significance goes far beyond fighting corruption within the Chinese Communist
A powerful weapon against corruption
China needs an authoritative and effective anti-corruption system with concentrated power. The new National Supervision Law has laid the foundation for the system.  The Communist Party has vowed to “put power in a cage.” The leadership has called for a stronger system that places power under the constraints of regulations and public scrutiny. In order to do that, we need a scientific and forceful mechanism, so officials will be kept away from corruption.  The existing anti-graft organs under the State Council have their blind spots. They only cover the civil service but leave out the legislature, the judiciary, state-owned enterprises, public institutions and social groups. A lack of indepen