Ann Cao

Ann Cao

Ann is a media student at the University of Hong Kong.

Ann Cao is a contributor to Inkstone. She is a media student at the University of Hong Kong.

Language spoken
English
Eating chili peppers is linked to dementia, study says
Love spicy hot food? Maybe it’s time to hold the hot sauce. Eating chili peppers may be linked to a decline in cognitive function and an added risk of dementia, a study has found. The study, published in the journal Nutrients in May, was conducted by five researchers from universities in Qatar, Australia and the US. Based on data collected from 4,582 Chinese people aged over 55 during a 15-year period, it concluded that chili intake was inversely related to cognitive ability. Those who ate more than 50 grams (1.7 ounces) of chili peppers a day had more than double the risk of poor memory, and a 56% higher risk of suffering memory loss, the study found. The cognitive decline was greater among
Protests fuel divisions at Hong Kong’s top university
The ongoing protests in Hong Kong have led to an escalating conflict at the city’s top university, fueled by tension between local and mainland Chinese students. Controversy erupted at the prestigious University of Hong Kong (HKU), after the school’s President Zhang Xiang publicly condemned the violent storming of Hong Kong’s legislature earlier this month.  In response, the Hong Kong University Students’ Union accused the president, a Chinese-born American physicist, of siding with the pro-Beijing government, while turning a blind eye towards the demands of protesters, many of whom are students at the school.  Last week, HKU students rallied outside Zhang’s residence at the university. Zhan
The secret life of a professional gamer
Chen Zebin, 22, was expecting easy money and fame. But he had a rough initiation into the life of a professional video game player. After joining the King e-sports team in Shanghai, his ambition hit a wall. He didn’t get into a tournament for almost 10 months. “My performance was no worse than the other players,” he said. “But I wasn’t allowed to play in the competition simply due to my lack of experience.” Chen, who had been a star gamer back home in the southern megacity of Shenzhen, was later diagnosed with depression. “I was so upset,” he said. “Sometimes I would cry and couldn’t stop.” Eventually, Chen got a chance to play in a tournament, which marked a turnaround in his life. He spec
Woman boss hits out at question about work-life balance
Zhang Quanling, an entrepreneur who had become famous as a TV host, has lashed out against sexism in Chinese society. When asked how she balanced work and family life, Zhang went on a tirade, pushing back on what she saw as a misogynistic question.  “I want to make it clear, I hate this question very much,” Zhang told an interviewer during an event with Empower Education Online, an online learning platform.  “Why do you ask this question? Because you expected that I should be balancing my family and work, so you posed this question to confirm. You would never ask me why I don’t play ball with Yao Ming, because you have no such expectation,” she said.  Footage of the interview has gathered m
A family couldn’t afford health care. So they drew lots
A Chinese husband was forced to pass up treatment for cancer so that his wife and daughter could both receive the medical care they needed. The 42-year-old man, Ke Meinan, was diagnosed with stomach cancer in 2015. A month later, his 46-year-old wife Wang Huaying was diagnosed with breast cancer. But when their 16-year-old daughter was diagnosed with the autoimmune disease lupus, the family, from the eastern province of Jiangxi, realized they could not afford to pay for all three of them to be treated. Ke convinced his wife to draw lots to decide which one would skip medical care – but later admitted to rigging the draw to ensure that she would continue to receive treatment. Footage of the
Facial recognition project identifying women in porn shut down
Until recently, a Chinese programmer was working on a facial recognition project that compared women’s social media selfies with stills from porn videos. After a storm of criticism, he’s shut it down. Programmers are mocked on Chinese social media as jiepanxia – men willing to enter into a relationship with a woman who has had a number of sexual partners. The developer, who went by the pseudonym Li Xu, claimed his goal was to help male programmers identify “promiscuous” women who had appeared in sex videos. Victimization of women because of their previous sexual lives strikes me as one of the most illegitimate purposes I can think of Marcelo Thompson, privacy expert In an interview last mont