Arman Dzidzovic

Arman Dzidzovic

Video Producer, Inkstone

Arman is a video producer at Inkstone. He was previously producing documentaries for VICE in Southeast Asia.

Location
Hong Kong
Language spoken
English, Indonesian
Areas of Expertise
Documentary filmmaking
The coronavirus pandemic could change the way we look at masks
While mask-wearing has become a part of life in East Asia since the start of the coronavirus pandemic, it has remained rare in the United States and Europe. In some cases, mask wearers of Asian descent have been frowned upon or even assaulted. We look at the history of surgical mask use during disease outbreaks and how they have become shunned in the place where the practice originated: America.
‘I can’t accept China having people of different skin colors’
China’s proposed bill on granting permanent residency to foreigners has unleashed a wave of xenophobia on the Chinese internet. Even though China has one of the lowest shares of foreign-born people in the entire world, many people worry that a potential rise in foreign immigrants will make their life harder. In response to the bill, people have posted hostile comments online, especially against black people and Muslims, demanding that the government toughen rules on immigration. We spoke with several fierce opponents of the permanent residency bill about why they do not want more immigrants in China.
‘I’m worried about black people’: Uproar in China over plan to attract foreigners
The Chinese government on Saturday has promised to revise a draft bill on issuing “green cards” to foreigners after the proposal unleashed a wave of online xenophobia. China has one of the world’s strictest permanent residency programs, but many citizens say they don’t want more immigrants, especially black people, to settle in the country. Millions of angry comments have flooded Chinese social media to protest against a plan that Beijing said was meant to attract more foreign talent to boost the economy. “I’m worried about black people and Islam,” David Zhu, a 33-year-old banker in Shanghai, told Inkstone, calling black people “uncivilized” and Islam “a cancer.” “You can tell from the exper
The secret links between Chinese and Thai food
Chinese and Thai cultures are linked for more than just their love of food. They have also been trading cooking styles and ingredients for generations. Traders from both regions often traveled between the two countries, bringing spices and cooking techniques to the other. You can taste it in Thai cooking today. We meet a Thai food expert in Bangkok to find out where these links come from and the Chinese culinary traditions hidden in plain sight in Thailand.
He rose to fame for exposing fake kung fu. Now he just wants to ‘survive’
For professional fighters, nerves before a match come with the job. But for Xu Xiaodong, China’s most controversial mixed martial artist, successfully leaving the country on a clear, cold day in November seemed like an impossible challenge. Standing in the departure hall of Beijing’s new international airport on a planned trip to Bangkok, Xu looked calm. But beneath the barrel-chested facade, the 41-year-old was full of worry. He felt like he was taking a huge gamble. Would he be allowed to board the flight to Thailand to take part in the most important fight of his life?  Two years ago, before Xu began taking on China’s kung fu establishment, the answer would have been a resounding yes. But
‘Basically like a poison’: the Chinese alchemists behind America’s drug crisis
The first time Alan, 32 and living in Texas, smoked the drug he bought online from China, he thought he would die.  He mixed a tiny amount of the powder, similar to the size of an eyelash, with dried plant leaves, smoked the concoction and immediately started losing control of his body. “I got sick. I was puking all over the place,” the 30-year-old recalled on the phone. “I kind of passed out. I blacked out, and in my mind I kind of had a death trip experience where I thought that I had died.” Even before the overdose, Alan, who is self-employed, had a dependence on synthetic cannabinoids, which are lab-made compounds created to mimic the effects and structure of THC in cannabis. Today, ther
Why China has its eyes on the North Pole
As melting sea ice makes shipping across the North Pole more viable, the Arctic Ocean has become an important region for countries to expand their presence. The Artic's potential has led to a spat between the US and China, both vying for influence around the North Pole and the potential economic opportunities. In the video above, we look into why the region is so important and why tension over China’s plans there could escalate.
China’s ‘Mad Dog’ fighter enters the battle of his life
The 41-year-old mixed martial arts fighter Xu Xiaodong has been a controversial figure in China ever since he became famous for beating up what he called “fake” kung fu masters. Unafraid to talk about almost anything, his brash attitude has brought him stardom but also unexpected – and unwelcome – knocks on his door. In November, he set out to prove that he’s more than a tough guy who dared to challenge a cherished Chinese tradition. In the video above, Inkstone follows Xu, nicknamed “Mad Dog,” as he fights the biggest fights of his career, for fame and freedom.  Subscribe to our YouTube channel for more stories about life, culture and politics in China.
Hong Kong voters back protests in historic election
The pro-democracy camp has won by a landslide in Sunday’s district polls as voters show their support to the anti-government protests.  The district council election had been seen as a test of public opinion on the continuing protests that have disrupted traffic and caused violent clashes between protesters and police.  In 2015, pro-democracy politicians only held 126 elected seats on the district council. In 2019, they won 388 seats, making pro-Beijing politicians the minority. (Candidates are divided into two camps according to their party affiliation and remarks made in public. Some candidates are considered independent.) Experts say the stunning victory by democrats in the election shows
Office workers join Hong Kong’s protests in shirts and heels
Most of Hong Kong’s protests have taken place on weekends, but now protesters are gathering on weekdays to pressure the government to address their demands.  In Central, the financial district that is home to banks and luxury stores, office workers have been showing up during lunchtime since Monday to voice their anger toward the government and police.  On Wednesday, hundreds of people joined the protest, before riot police were deployed to disperse the crowd.  In the video above, we spoke to some lunchtime protesters about their roles in the movement and the escalating violence in Hong Kong.