Arman Dzidzovic

Arman Dzidzovic

Video Producer, Inkstone

Arman is a video producer at Inkstone. He was previously producing documentaries for VICE in Southeast Asia.

Location
Hong Kong
Language spoken
English, Indonesian
Areas of Expertise
Documentary filmmaking
Hong Kong voters back protests in historic election
The pro-democracy camp has won by a landslide in Sunday’s district polls as voters show their support to the anti-government protests.  The district council election had been seen as a test of public opinion on the continuing protests that have disrupted traffic and caused violent clashes between protesters and police.  In 2015, pro-democracy politicians only held 126 elected seats on the district council. In 2019, they won 388 seats, making pro-Beijing politicians the minority. (Candidates are divided into two camps according to their party affiliation and remarks made in public. Some candidates are considered independent.) Experts say the stunning victory by democrats in the election shows
Hong Kong voters back protests in historic election
Office workers join Hong Kong's protests in shirts and heels
Most of Hong Kong’s protests have taken place on weekends, but now protesters are gathering on weekdays to pressure the government to address their demands.  In Central, the financial district that is home to banks and luxury stores, office workers have been showing up during lunchtime since Monday to voice their anger toward the government and police.  On Wednesday, hundreds of people joined the protest, before riot police were deployed to disperse the crowd.  In the video above, we spoke to some lunchtime protesters about their roles in the movement and the escalating violence in Hong Kong. 
Office workers join Hong Kong's protests in shirts and heels
Why Andrew Yang’s name sounds weird to Chinese speakers
How do you pronounce the surname of the US presidential candidate Andrew Yang? Does it rhyme with “gang,” as in “Yang Gang”?  While this pronunciation may be intuitive to Americans – it’s how the Democratic hopeful says his name – it might sound a little off to Chinese ears. In the video above, we explain the difference between how Mandarin speakers pronounce the popular Chinese last name and how most Americans say it.
Why Andrew Yang’s name sounds weird to Chinese speakers
5G in China starts at $18 a month
China has finally launched 5G networks around the country, offering breakneck internet speeds of up to 1GB per second to Chinese mobile phone users. 5G is set to transform digital life, and China is one of the places leading the charge with investments in 5G infrastructure and technology.  Although Chinese 5G plans are on sale for as little as $18 a month, many Chinese internet users aren’t rushing to sign up. Watch the video, above, to find out why.
5G in China starts at $18 a month
Halloween protests spook Hong Kong
In one of Hong Kong’s most popular nightlife districts, Halloween is usually an occasion for drinking and partying. This year, however, the spooky holiday was turned into a night of protest against the government and the police. Watch the video, above, to find out how demonstrators in masks and costumes celebrated a special Halloween.
Halloween protests spook Hong Kong
Inside Hong Kong’s deep divide
Months of anti-government protests have roiled Hong Kong and exposed deep divisions in society. Politics has colored and changed seemingly everything, from where people eat and shop to weddings. Watch the video, above, for a look into the divide tearing the city apart.
Inside Hong Kong’s deep divide
What China’s soldiers eat in the field
Like most armies around the world, the Chinese military has its own brand of ready-to-eat meals, designed to be eaten out in the field.  It’s a challenge to cater to the different tastes in the world’s biggest armed force. Chinese soldiers have in the past complained about the plain flavors of their rations.  Despite that, rations made for the People’s Liberation Army have become popular among the country’s military enthusiasts. PLA meal packs can be easily found on online shopping sites.  We taste-tested two sets of ready-to-eat meals designed for Chinese soldiers. Watch the video to find out more. 
What China’s soldiers eat in the field
A town hall with Hong Kong’s embattled leader
Hong Kong’s embattled leader Carrie Lam held her first town hall with Hong Kong residents on Thursday, following three months of anti-government protests. Lam says she wants to engage directly with the people, but protesters have called the event a publicity stunt aimed at promoting her own agenda.  The first group of about 150 attendees was randomly selected from among more than 20,000 applicants.  Many attacked Lam fiercely and voiced support for the protesters’ demands, while a few other speakers criticized the protesters’ use of violence.  We went to Lam’s first town hall and met demonstrators outside the venue. Watch the video to find out more.
 A town hall with Hong Kong’s embattled leader
How China is gearing up to fuel America’s CBD craze
On a remote mountainside overlooking a misty valley, rows of cannabis plants are growing near fields of tobacco and corn. This isn’t a pot farm in California. It’s in southwestern China’s Yunnan. China has one of the strictest drug control policies in the world. But here in a mountainous region bordering Myanmar, Laos and Vietnam, cannabis is being touted as a crop that could bring untold wealth to farmers and businesses. That’s because these plants won’t get you high. They don’t have enough of a chemical called tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, which is responsible for the euphoric feeling. Instead, they’re rich in cannabidiol, often called CBD, another chemical extracted from cannabis that isn
How China is gearing up to fuel America’s CBD craze
China is betting big on the global CBD boom
A boom in the popularity of cannabis-derived cannabidiol (CBD) in the US and Europe has started a frenzy of interest in commercial hemp grown in China. CBD is believed to help cure a range of illnesses, even though there is little scientific evidence. But that hasn’t stopped the industry from growing. The global CBD market is expected to hit $16 billion by 2025, according to one estimate. Viola Zhou visited southwestern China’s Yunnan province, where it is legal to grow commercial cannabis, to see how this CBD boom is playing out in China.
China is betting big on the global CBD boom