Ian Young

Ian Young

Vancouver correspondent

Ian is a contributor to Inkstone. He is the Vancouver correspondent of the South China Morning Post.

Location
Vancouver
Language spoken
English
Areas of Expertise
International relations, the Chinese diaspora, real estate and immigration
Canada court punishes a WeChat user for spreading false information
A court ruling in Canada could put a stop on the freewheeling political posts in the country on WeChat, a WhatsApp-like super app popular among Chinese communities.  A Toronto construction worker, Wu Jian, was sued for defamation and ordered by the court to pay more than $38,000 after he posted a series of comments directed at a local community leader, Simon Zhong Xinsheng, in a WeChat political discussion group.  Justice Penny J. Jones of the Ontario Court of Justice said Wu’s comments on Zhong were malicious falsehoods. “The evidence before the court is that none of the defamatory statements made about Mr Zhong in the WeChat posts are true,” Jones wrote in her judgment.  WeChat has been a
No need to wear masks in Canada, but consider this before you mock people who do
In early 2003, my soon-to-be wife and I developed a routine when we came home. We would take off our N95 face masks and drop them in a bin by the door. We would strip off in the entranceway in a thoroughly unromantic fashion and throw our clothes in the washing machine with a hearty slosh of Dettol. We then showered immediately, and retired to consider the unusual and frightening existence that was Hong Kong at the height of the Sars epidemic. Which is why current and former Hongkongers like ourselves find nothing particularly funny about the Wuhan coronavirus outbreak. Yet some Canadians make sport of the face masks being worn with increasing regularity in places with big east Asian popula
‘Free Ms Meng’ and ‘send $$$ 4 nudez’: the scene outside Huawei CFO’s trial
One encourages people on her social media profile to “send $$$ 4 nudez.” Others include a professional actress, a Vancouver artist and a young man whose fondness for starring in pornographic selfies had made his Twitter feed decidedly NSFW. What united them all on Monday was an apparent devotion to the cause of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou, in her bid to avoid extradition to the United States on fraud charges. They and a couple dozen others stood outside the Supreme Court of British Columbia on the first day of Meng’s extradition hearing in Vancouver, holding signs demanding “Justice For Ms Meng” and other slogans.  They appeared in the background of reports by Chinese state broadcasters CC
Canadian university must thread needle between the US and Huawei
At the University of British Colombia, western Canada’s most prestigious university, some academics fear that connections to Huawei could put them in peril, even as the company continues to spend millions on research there. Since the arrest of Meng Wanzhou in December 2018, 18 new projects have been earmarked for Huawei funding at UBC, costing the company $2 million, according to a spreadsheet provided by the university. However, UBC engineering professor Lukas Chrostowski said he knew of at least three department colleagues who have refused to take part in Huawei-financed projects because they worry they will be swept up in US action against the firm. His own work in photonics – the use of
Man gets manslaughter in Vancouver after chopping victim into 108 pieces
A man who killed a Chinese millionaire before chopping him into 108 pieces has been found not guilty of the businessman’s murder, after a judge ruled that the intent to kill had not been proved. British Columbia Supreme Court Justice Terence Schultes instead found Zhao Li, 59, guilty of the lesser charge of manslaughter, as well as interfering with human remains. Outside the court on Tuesday, Zhao’s lawyer Ian Donaldson praised the ruling and said his client was a “completely normal” man, whose actions on May 2, 2015, were considered “unthinkable” by those who knew him. Zhao, an experienced hunter, did not dispute having shot dead Yuan Gang, 42, with a rifle in the driveway of his Vancouver
Canadian cops go undercover in the world’s most-Chinese city outside Asia
The world’s most-Chinese city outside of Asia is Richmond, near Vancouver, on the west coast of Canada. It was here outside the Aberdeen Centre mall that supporters of the Hong Kong protest movement were marking China’s National Day on Tuesday by building a Lennon Wall – and counterprotesting opponents were tearing it down. Taunts and challenges turned into shoving. Then there were cheers and applause when uniformed police appeared on the scene and led away two of the counterprotesters, to shouts of “go back to China” and “stand with Hong Kong,” video of the incident shows. But unseen by the 50 or so protesters and about a dozen opponents were undercover officers from the Royal Canadian Moun
Why a pro-democracy tycoon ‘sold everything’ in Hong Kong and ran to Canada
In the closet of his Vancouver home, Albert Cheng King-hon now has 100 ties that he never wears. The once-dapper Hong Kong broadcaster, media tycoon, ex-legislator and nemesis of the establishment fingers the frayed buttonhole of a comfortable-looking gray shirt as we sit in a Gastown coffee shop, surrounded by oblivious hipsters and tourists. “Look at me. I wear this every day,” he says, laughing at the state of the man known to Hongkongers as Taipan. “Maybe I should start wearing my ties again. I should try to look respectable. Like a businessman.” Cheng, a self-described lifelong “radical” who has tormented Hong Kong and Beijing authorities for decades, is still settling into life in Vanc
He is pro-China. She is pro-Hong Kong. They had a heart-to-heart over boba
Fenella Sung sits across from Victor Feng at a narrow bench table at Bubble Queen on Vancouver’s Oak Street. She’s nursing a hot rose jasmine tea – a somewhat radical choice in a bubble-tea joint – but it’s “fantastic,” she assures Feng, who sips a cold milk tea with tapioca balls, the classic variant of the genre. “I like to keep things simple,” he says. Three weekends earlier, they had faced each other under very different circumstances in this Canadian city that has 188,000 mainland-Chinese immigrants, more than 71,000 from Hong Kong and all the tensions that implies. Sung, 61, a long-time pro-democracy campaigner, was among the black-shirted activists rallying in sympathy with the Hong K
Ferrari-driving Chinese patriots rev up protests in Canada
Convoys of Chinese patriots in Ferraris and other high-end sports cars have been revving up pro-Beijing demonstrations in Canada, home to tens of thousands of Chinese millionaire migrants. Drivers of luxury sports cars – which also included McLarens, Porsches and Aston Martins – waved Chinese flags, gunned their engines and honked their horns to cheers from pro-China demonstrators in Vancouver and Toronto, who were facing off against groups supporting the Hong Kong protest movement. In Vancouver, at the busy intersection of Broadway and Cambie Street, hundreds of rival demonstrators had gathered on Saturday afternoon at a major subway station. Protester Kevin Huang Yi Shuen, who supported th
Tycoon and daughter said they loved each other. Then they sued
Chinese tycoon Li Jianhua once planned to live next door to his daughter in Vancouver after he retired from a career that has brought him political prestige and great wealth in China. The daughter, Carol Li, proclaimed “devotion and filial piety” to her father. He declared “love and affection” for his only child. But instead of living out his days beside his daughter, widowed Li Jianhua, 65, is battling her in Canadian courts over a $14.1 million Vancouver real estate fortune. Unproven and untested accusations of fraud and violence were made. Li denies his daughter’s claims. She denies his counterclaims. The conflict, depicted in legal documents obtained by the South China Morning Post, shed