Ian Young

Ian Young

Vancouver correspondent

Ian is a contributor to Inkstone. He is the Vancouver correspondent of the South China Morning Post.

Location
Vancouver
Language spoken
English
Areas of Expertise
International relations, the Chinese diaspora, real estate and immigration
Canadian university must thread needle between the US and Huawei
At the University of British Colombia, western Canada’s most prestigious university, some academics fear that connections to Huawei could put them in peril, even as the company continues to spend millions on research there. Since the arrest of Meng Wanzhou in December 2018, 18 new projects have been earmarked for Huawei funding at UBC, costing the company $2 million, according to a spreadsheet provided by the university. However, UBC engineering professor Lukas Chrostowski said he knew of at least three department colleagues who have refused to take part in Huawei-financed projects because they worry they will be swept up in US action against the firm. His own work in photonics – the use of
Canadian university must thread needle between the US and Huawei
Man gets manslaughter in Vancouver after chopping victim into 108 pieces
A man who killed a Chinese millionaire before chopping him into 108 pieces has been found not guilty of the businessman’s murder, after a judge ruled that the intent to kill had not been proved. British Columbia Supreme Court Justice Terence Schultes instead found Zhao Li, 59, guilty of the lesser charge of manslaughter, as well as interfering with human remains. Outside the court on Tuesday, Zhao’s lawyer Ian Donaldson praised the ruling and said his client was a “completely normal” man, whose actions on May 2, 2015, were considered “unthinkable” by those who knew him. Zhao, an experienced hunter, did not dispute having shot dead Yuan Gang, 42, with a rifle in the driveway of his Vancouver
 Man gets manslaughter in Vancouver after chopping victim into 108 pieces
Canadian cops go undercover in the world’s most-Chinese city outside Asia
The world’s most-Chinese city outside of Asia is Richmond, near Vancouver, on the west coast of Canada. It was here outside the Aberdeen Centre mall that supporters of the Hong Kong protest movement were marking China’s National Day on Tuesday by building a Lennon Wall – and counterprotesting opponents were tearing it down. Taunts and challenges turned into shoving. Then there were cheers and applause when uniformed police appeared on the scene and led away two of the counterprotesters, to shouts of “go back to China” and “stand with Hong Kong,” video of the incident shows. But unseen by the 50 or so protesters and about a dozen opponents were undercover officers from the Royal Canadian Moun
Canadian cops go undercover in the world’s most-Chinese city outside Asia
Why a pro-democracy tycoon ‘sold everything’ in Hong Kong and ran to Canada
In the closet of his Vancouver home, Albert Cheng King-hon now has 100 ties that he never wears. The once-dapper Hong Kong broadcaster, media tycoon, ex-legislator and nemesis of the establishment fingers the frayed buttonhole of a comfortable-looking gray shirt as we sit in a Gastown coffee shop, surrounded by oblivious hipsters and tourists. “Look at me. I wear this every day,” he says, laughing at the state of the man known to Hongkongers as Taipan. “Maybe I should start wearing my ties again. I should try to look respectable. Like a businessman.” Cheng, a self-described lifelong “radical” who has tormented Hong Kong and Beijing authorities for decades, is still settling into life in Vanc
Why a pro-democracy tycoon ‘sold everything’ in Hong Kong and ran to Canada
He is pro-China. She is pro-Hong Kong. They had a heart-to-heart over boba
Fenella Sung sits across from Victor Feng at a narrow bench table at Bubble Queen on Vancouver’s Oak Street. She’s nursing a hot rose jasmine tea – a somewhat radical choice in a bubble-tea joint – but it’s “fantastic,” she assures Feng, who sips a cold milk tea with tapioca balls, the classic variant of the genre. “I like to keep things simple,” he says. Three weekends earlier, they had faced each other under very different circumstances in this Canadian city that has 188,000 mainland-Chinese immigrants, more than 71,000 from Hong Kong and all the tensions that implies. Sung, 61, a long-time pro-democracy campaigner, was among the black-shirted activists rallying in sympathy with the Hong K
He is pro-China. She is pro-Hong Kong. They had a heart-to-heart over boba
Ferrari-driving Chinese patriots rev up protests in Canada
Convoys of Chinese patriots in Ferraris and other high-end sports cars have been revving up pro-Beijing demonstrations in Canada, home to tens of thousands of Chinese millionaire migrants. Drivers of luxury sports cars – which also included McLarens, Porsches and Aston Martins – waved Chinese flags, gunned their engines and honked their horns to cheers from pro-China demonstrators in Vancouver and Toronto, who were facing off against groups supporting the Hong Kong protest movement. In Vancouver, at the busy intersection of Broadway and Cambie Street, hundreds of rival demonstrators had gathered on Saturday afternoon at a major subway station. Protester Kevin Huang Yi Shuen, who supported th
Ferrari-driving Chinese patriots rev up protests in Canada
Tycoon and daughter said they loved each other. Then they sued
Chinese tycoon Li Jianhua once planned to live next door to his daughter in Vancouver after he retired from a career that has brought him political prestige and great wealth in China. The daughter, Carol Li, proclaimed “devotion and filial piety” to her father. He declared “love and affection” for his only child. But instead of living out his days beside his daughter, widowed Li Jianhua, 65, is battling her in Canadian courts over a $14.1 million Vancouver real estate fortune. Unproven and untested accusations of fraud and violence were made. Li denies his daughter’s claims. She denies his counterclaims. The conflict, depicted in legal documents obtained by the South China Morning Post, shed
Tycoon and daughter said they loved each other. Then they sued
Chinese traditions are no excuse for disinheriting daughters in British Columbia
The elderly Chinese immigrant came to the office of Vancouver lawyer Trevor Todd, a long-time neighbor, with plans to write his will. He brought with him his wife of 35 years – and the intention to disinherit her and their daughter, and instead leave the entire family fortune to the couple’s adult son. “I told him ‘forget it’,” said Todd last week, of the encounter 15 years ago.  Todd’s neighbor was hardly an outlier. Lawyers say sex-based disinheritance of Asian women is common in Canada, with wives and daughters sometimes “shafted” (to use Todd’s wording) by the will of a family patriarch. But the phenomenon is now under scrutiny, thanks to a high-profile multimillion-dollar court victory
Chinese traditions are no excuse for disinheriting daughters in British Columbia
He called us ‘the g-word’ and told us to go home
Social media is filled with uplifting stories of people who encounter racism and rise above it. People of color who wade through the mire to embrace or convert their tormentors – or, at least, distinguish themselves in the face of ignorance. They go low, we go high. This is not one of those stories. The facts of my encounter with a real-life racist in Vancouver, your honor, are as follows. On July 10, a random white man called my wife and me “gooks,” an awful thing to do. He followed us and told us to “go home.” I confronted him and he backed down. So far, so woke. Here are the bits I left out. They do not enhance my heroic tale. He was homeless, or looked it. He was pushing his belongings
He called us ‘the g-word’ and told us to go home
Canadian public opinion of China deteriorates sharply
Canadians’ views on China have worsened significantly in recent months, according to a new poll.  More than two-thirds of Canadians are now rejecting closer ties with Beijing. A similar proportion wants Huawei, a Chinese telecoms giant, to be banned from the country’s 5G networks, according to a study by Research Co, a public opinion research company. Mario Canseco, president of Research Co, said Canadian perceptions of China had “deteriorated markedly” over the past five months and that the speed of deterioration “was really surprising.”  The poll also found increasing support for Canada’s handling of the case of Meng Wanzhou, a Huawei executive. Meng was arrested in Canada in December, at
Canadian public opinion of China deteriorates sharply