Alan Wong

Alan Wong

Alan is deputy editor at Inkstone. He was previously a digital editor for The New York Times in Hong Kong.

Battle for No 2 Bridge: Hong Kong student protesters clash with police
The hillside campus of a top Hong Kong university was on edge on Wednesday after it was turned into a battlefield between masked student protesters and the police. Once known for its tranquility, the site of the Chinese University of Hong Kong became a flashpoint on Tuesday as riot police officers and students fought over a bridge on the eastern edge of the campus. Called the No 2 Bridge, the structure straddles the Tolo Highway, a major artery in the city’s New Territories region. Black-masked student protesters, huddled behind tables and other makeshift shields, clashed with riot police against the backdrop of swirling tear gas and the amber of raging fires. The resulting smoke could be s
Battle for No 2 Bridge: Hong Kong student protesters clash with police
The ‘widespread misconception’ fueling mainland Chinese anger at Hong Kong
When a police officer fired bullets at masked protesters in Hong Kong on Monday morning, the scene went viral online across the city and mainland China. What happened was not in dispute, but their perceptions were wildly different. While Hongkongers were outraged and questioned the officer’s use of live ammunition, viewers in the mainland put the blame squarely on the protesters, including the 21-year-old student who was shot. “The police officer was firing to save his life from the cockroach. He did nothing wrong,” said a top comment on the Weibo social media site popular among mainland Chinese users. The divergence highlights the wide divide in public opinion between mainland China and the
The ‘widespread misconception’ fueling mainland Chinese anger at Hong Kong
Why Andrew Yang’s name sounds weird to Chinese speakers
How do you pronounce the surname of the US presidential candidate Andrew Yang? Does it rhyme with “gang,” as in “Yang Gang”?  While this pronunciation may be intuitive to Americans – it’s how the Democratic hopeful says his name – it might sound a little off to Chinese ears. In the video above, we explain the difference between how Mandarin speakers pronounce the popular Chinese last name and how most Americans say it.
Why Andrew Yang’s name sounds weird to Chinese speakers
The short video app at the center of a US security debate
The videos look innocuous enough. Selfies. Stunts. Scripted comedy. cat lady in training pic.twitter.com/LKovVQYknh — TikTok (@tiktok_us) November 2, 2019 But TikTok, a rare Chinese-owned social media app that has thrived outside China, has found itself the target of a serious accusation: threatening American security. The intensifying scrutiny on the app, owned by the Chinese internet giant ByteDance, has come amid rising suspicion in Washington of Beijing’s growing global influence. US lawmakers and critics of the Chinese government have accused the popular video-sharing app of potentially allowing China’s ruling Communist Party to exploit information about its millions of American users f
The short video app at the center of a US security debate
Hong Kong’s embattled leader gets pat on the back from her boss
The beleaguered leader of Hong Kong received a key stamp of approval from President Xi Jinping of China amid continuing anti-government protests that have rocked the Asian financial hub. Xi on Monday gave his first direct and public endorsement of Lam’s leadership since large-scale and increasingly violent protests began consuming the former British colony in June. Lam has apologized for causing the worst political crisis since the city returned to Chinese rule in 1997 as a special region vested with considerable autonomy and an independent judiciary. The debacle, which stemmed from popular opposition to a now-withdrawn plan to allow extradition to mainland China, has made Lam the least po
Hong Kong’s embattled leader gets pat on the back from her boss
Xi Jinping sent Chinese investors into blockchain frenzy
Chinese stocks associated with blockchain jumped after President Xi Jinping extolled the technology popularized by Bitcoin. Dozens of Chinese financial and technology firms making use of the digital database rose to their daily 10% limit on Monday. It was the first day of trading in China after Chinese state media reported on Friday evening Xi’s speech urging the development of blockchain technology. Xi’s remarks represented a stamp of approval from the highest level of China’s government of blockchain, potentially accelerating and widening the application of the technology in industries including banking and supply chain management. A blockchain is akin to a digital ledger, allowing users t
Xi Jinping sent Chinese investors into blockchain frenzy
A ‘dead’ bill behind Hong Kong’s unrest is finally buried
First it was suspended, then declared “dead.” But it was not until weeks of violent clashes later that the Hong Kong government formally buried a contentious bill that would have allowed extradition to mainland China from the semi-autonomous Chinese city. The plan was put to rest on Wednesday with its formal withdrawal from the city’s legislative agenda, an expected move to fulfill a key demand put forward by anti-government protesters since June. The bill’s withdrawal at this time is unlikely to stop the continuing weekly demonstrations fueled by anger at alleged police abuse of force and calls for electoral reforms. The city’s leader, Carrie Lam, had pushed for the bill by citing the need
A ‘dead’ bill behind Hong Kong’s unrest is finally buried
Murder suspect in Hong Kong wants to surrender. It’s not so easy
A political dispute between Hong Kong and Taiwan could prevent the prime suspect in a gruesome murder case that has triggered months of unrest from surrendering himself. The suspect, Chan Tong-kai, agreed to voluntarily leave Hong Kong for Taiwan to face justice for allegedly killing his pregnant girlfriend on the self-ruled island in 2018. The infamous case sparked an extradition debate that rocked Hong Kong. Chan, 20, has avoided trial for murder since his return to Hong Kong, which cannot prosecute crimes committed in other jurisdictions. He has agreed to surrender to Taiwanese authorities after finishing an 18-month prison sentence in Hong Kong on Wednesday for committing lesser crimes. 
Murder suspect in Hong Kong wants to surrender. It’s not so easy
Hong Kong leader dodges protest demands in policy report
Hong Kong’s leader offered no immediate solutions to resolve continuing unrest in her first major policy speech since anti-government protests broke out in June. Calling the crisis in the former British colony “the most formidable challenge” since it returned to Chinese rule in 1997, Chief Executive Carrie Lam ruled out giving in to more demands from protesters. Large-scale demonstrations began in June in opposition to an unpopular bill feared to erode the political firewall between Beijing and Hong Kong, which is governed under an arrangement known as “one country, two systems.” While Lam has vowed to drop the bill, which would have allowed extradition to mainland China, the protests have
Hong Kong leader dodges protest demands in policy report
Apple tapes up Hong Kong store as ‘precaution’ after removing protest app
Apple has wrapped a protective plastic film around the exterior of at least one of its stores in Hong Kong after it removed an app used by the city’s anti-government protesters. The iPhone maker on Thursday removed from its App Store an app that allows users to report and track police and protest activities following a backlash from China. Hours after the app’s removal, a layer of translucent film was applied to the glass walls of Apple’s store in the bustling Causeway Bay district, a frequent protest site. Masked demonstrators had previously vandalized businesses with Chinese links using spray paint or weapons such as petrol bombs. A protest movement calling for greater accountability and
Apple tapes up Hong Kong store as ‘precaution’ after removing protest app