Jeffie Lam

Jeffie Lam

Correspondent

Jeffie is a contributor to Inkstone. She is a reporter for the South China Morning Post.

Location
Hong Kong
Language spoken
English, Mandarin, Cantonese
Areas of Expertise
Hong Kong politics,, Hong Kong constitutional and legislative issues,, Political analysis and Hong Kong's ageing population
Bracing for clashes: Hong Kong protesters turn college campus into fortress
Visitors and staff trying to enter a university in Hong Kong that was the site of a fiery battle between protesters and police this week have encountered a makeshift checkpoint. Protesters wearing black who guard the booth – made of bamboo sticks, umbrellas and a door from a trashed car – have roughly searched through any visitor belongings and questioned the purpose of their visit to the Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) in Sha Tin. A plank at the checkpoint has the words “CU arrival” scrawled on it. The protesters claimed their intention was to prevent plain-clothes police officers from getting onto the campus, but it has resulted in many people, especially university staff, feeling d
Bracing for clashes: Hong Kong protesters turn college campus into fortress
The Hong Kong teenagers risking it all for their ideals
As a teenage activist on the front line of Hong Kong’s social unrest, Sophia never leaves home on weekends without a collapsible bucket in her backpack. During clashes with police, she swoops in with her bucket filled with water and coolly throws tear gas canisters into it using industrial gloves. Sometimes, she flings a canister back at the police. “I want to protect others as I know how painful it is to be gassed,” she said. At 17, Sophia is one of the tens of thousands of teenagers who make up the backbone of a monthslong movement demanding greater accountability and freer elections. They give up their weekends to press on with the protests, week after week, risking arrests and getting hi
The Hong Kong teenagers risking it all for their ideals
Hong Kong protesters vow to ramp up campaign after teenager shot
Peaceful and violent protesters alike vowed to be even more resolute in escalating their anti-government campaign in Hong Kong after a high school student was hit by a live round fired by a policeman under attack. Protesters called the shooting on Tuesday “a debt of blood” that would have to be paid, capping a day of all-out street violence across the city as they seized on the 70th birthday of Communist China to call on the government into meeting their demands.  On Wednesday, hundreds of people gathered at the financial district of Central to protest against the shooting, bringing traffic to a standstill.  Many demonstrators were office workers taking a lunch break. “We are seeing an escal
Hong Kong protesters vow to ramp up campaign after teenager shot
Hong Kong officials will watch China’s flag rise indoors to avoid clashes
Hong Kong is set to tone down celebrations on China’s big day, the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People’s Republic. The local government said it would move guests indoors at a flag-raising ceremony on China’s National Day, on October 1, to avoid potential disruptions by anti-government protesters who are poised to escalate their actions to embarrass Beijing. This means Hong Kong’s leader, Chief Executive Carrie Lam, and other officials and dignitaries will watch the ceremony on a screen.  “I think Beijing has come to terms with the reality that ceremonies like these can’t be held in a decent manner amid the long-standing protests,” Chinese University political scientist Ivan Choy s
Hong Kong officials will watch China’s flag rise indoors to avoid clashes
Hong Kong police used ‘retaliatory violence’ against protesters, watchdog says
Hong Kong’s police force has been accused of using “retaliatory violence” by torturing or ill-treating suspected anti-government protesters, according to an investigation by a human rights group. The findings released on Friday by Amnesty International included interviews with 21 people arrested but later released. They claimed they were punched or severely beaten by officers with batons even when they did not put up any resistance. Others told the rights watchdog they were assaulted or threatened at police stations. Anger at the police’s use of force in the monthslong protests has continued to be a key driver of the protest movement. Protesters have focused on demanding accountability and d
Hong Kong police used ‘retaliatory violence’ against protesters, watchdog says
Hong Kong protest organizer attacked with baseball bats
An organizer of some of the largest anti-government demonstrations in Hong Kong’s history was attacked on Thursday. Jimmy Sham, the convener of the Civil Human Rights Front, and his assistant were hit by two masked men with baseball bats in a restaurant. The assault came on the eve of planned protests on Saturday demanding freer elections of the leader and legislature of the former British colony, which returned to Chinese rule under an arrangement called “one country, two systems.” Increasingly concerned that the political firewall between Beijing and Hong Kong is being eroded, a generation of young people has taken to the streets to take part in what they consider to be a fight to preserve
Hong Kong protest organizer attacked with baseball bats
What ‘liberate Hong Kong’ really means
When pro-independence activist Edward Leung first declared his election slogan “Liberate Hong Kong; revolution of our times” in 2016, few could relate to it or understand what it meant. But over the past week, the rallying cry of the now-jailed student leader has become the most commonly heard chant in the city as long-running protests against an extradition bill have morphed into a full-blown anti-government movement. Black-clad young protesters in balaclavas, masks and helmets have been leaving their imprint wherever they go by spray-painting the catchphrase since July 21 – the night scores of them vandalized Beijing’s liaison office in the semi-autonomous Chinese city and defaced the nat
What ‘liberate Hong Kong’ really means
Voter registration spikes in Hong Kong amid protests
The number of registered voters in Hong Kong between the ages of 18 and 35 has jumped more than 12% from last year. More of these young people, the faces of the recent anti-government protests, became new voters than any other age group.  The demonstrations that began in June opposing a contentious bill to allow extraditions to mainland China have exposed widespread concerns about eroding autonomy and freedoms. The new voters could help weaken Beijing’s political influence in Hong Kong in local council elections in November, analysts said. The former British colony returned to Chinese rule in 1997 as a region governed under the principle of “one country, two systems,” but many people increa
Voter registration spikes in Hong Kong amid protests
Why are Hong Kong youth angry?
Inside Hong Kong’s gleaming legislative building, the youngsters made themselves heard using spray paint. Words and phrases such as “dog officials,” “freedom” and “Hong Kong is not China – not yet” were scrawled on the walls, in Chinese as well as English. It was July 1, the 22nd anniversary of the city’s return to Chinese rule. But as the break-in made clear, it was no time for celebration for some people. The devastating scenes of vandalism shocked the world and exposed the despair and desperation of the city’s youth. The siege of the Legislative Council building followed massive street protests since early June against a contentious extradition bill protesters feared could erode the forme
Why are Hong Kong youth angry?
After protests, sticky notes take over Hong Kong streets
They sprang up seemingly overnight: on footbridges, in pedestrian underpasses and at bus stops. They took over walls, storefronts and construction site fencing. When damaged, they regenerated. Neighborhoods across Hong Kong are covered in colorful Post-it notes in support of a series of protests against a contentious – and now declared “dead” – government plan that would have allowed extraditions to mainland China.  The walls of messages, known here as Lennon Walls, have emerged as a potent symbol of defiance against perceived attempts to blur the line between the highly autonomous Chinese city and the mainland.  The former British colony returned to Chinese rule under the promise that it w
After protests, sticky notes take over Hong Kong streets